Potable WATER Tank HELP WANTED

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Potable WATER TANK DIVER WANTED

ESTABLISHED WATER TANK AND TOWER INSPECTION AND CLEANING COMPANY is seeking a commercial diver. Good criminal history and driving record is required.

PAID- Out of town travel is required on both positions (typically 3-4 days per week).

Line Air Dive Training is Required. Commercial Diver Experience is preferred.
Fall protection and confined space training are required and may be provided free of charge for the right individual. CURRENT SCUBA, CPR Certification and recent diving physical are required, preference given to ADCI Certified Diver.

Top PAY for experienced Water TANK and TOWER DIVER. E-mail resume and salary history.

Key Responsibilities:
Work underwater and above water with a Dive Team of 3 – 4 commercially certified divers. Efficiently and effectively perform water tank and tower inspections and the removal of tank sediment from the floor of water storage tanks. Must be able to climb 100-200 foot ladders. Must be fit and able to carry gear bags up to 80 pounds.

Working Conditions:

Love of working outdoors is essential and the willingness to work in bad weather conditions. (i.e. rain, high humidity and heat).

Required to work a minimum of 35 hours per week for FT position.
Able to work occasional weekends and overtime as needed.

Employment is year round. Pay based on experience. Pre-employment drug screening is required. This position requires frequent out of town travel, paid by company (from Fort Worth, Texas). Please e-mail resume and use “Resume” on subject line.

Call 817-377-4899 (voice only) to schedule interview M-F 8 to 5.

Request an application from Debi at tankinspections@aol.com

 

Missouri has no requirement to clean water towers

Chris Hayes from Fox2 News in St Louis, Missouri recently interviewed me for a story he did about a water tank in Leadwood, Missouri. The tank had been inspected once about 17 years ago and as far as anyone knew, had never been cleaned. Chris was contacted by some residents of the community who had brown water coming out of their taps.

I was happy to contribute both video and comments to this story. Water storage tanks should be inspected yearly for public safety, even if the state they are in has no regulations at all. Mr. Hayes did a great job. He found the larger systems around St. Louis had all been recently inspected. Many smaller systems seem to fall back on regulations to decide what is really important.

Although the state of Missouri has no written regulation or rules on when tanks should be inspected they do say this about the inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks: “...clearly necessary to protect public health.”

You would not drink out of a dirty glass, why do these people have to drink water from a dirty tank?  See the video on our Company Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech  

BE SURE TO LIKE THE PAGE WHILE YOU ARE THERE!

References:

Missouri Department of Natural Resources
Water Protection Program – Public Drinking Water Branch

Microbial Contamination of Water Storage Tanks Fact Sheet

Inspection of Water Storage Facilities Fact Sheet

USEPA – Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Health Risks From Microbial Growth and Biofilms in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.  Page: 26 section G, Page 34 section I,

Distribution System Issue Paper. Finished Water Storage Facilities. August 15, 2002. Page 2, 11, and 12.

Total Coliform Rule Issue Paper. Inorganic Contaminant Accumulation in Potable Water Distribution Systems.

Check out our April Newsletter

 

Check out our April 2017 Newsletter:  CLICK HERE
We inspect your facilities with no water loss or
 disruption in service!
Stop by our booth and see our Underwater Inspection
video that saves time, water and money!

We want to be your contracted inspection service!
Call today for free quote 888-481-1786
Our underwater cameras provide the best documentation 
with the lowest cost
and NO DISRUPTION IN SERVICE

Check out our April 2017 Newsletter:  CLICK HERE

On the NEWS with i-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.  

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.

This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

Sediment being removed

Sediment being removed

Safe tap water is something everyone should have.

Crew Prepares for Dive

Crew Prepares for Dive

                                          Click Here to see:    CBS DFW_ VIDEO

 

NEWSsinc.com VIDEO

     SEE THE FULL STORY HERE: 

CBS 11 DFW NEWS STORY  http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

This story aired on 

Thanks for taking the time to check this out.

Photos taken by

RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan

Find us on FACEBOOK  or connect with Ron on Linked-In

Visit my You Tube Channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/RonPerrin for more great videos like these:

THE EPA MAY SOON REQUIRE ALL WATER STORAGE TANKS AND TOWERS TO BE INSPECTED AND CLEANED

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

On October 15th 2014 the EPA held a meeting to decide if there should be a rule to require water storage tanks and towers to be cleaned and inspected.

The webinar is over but the EPA is still taking comments until the end of 2014.  If you would like to make a comment on this issue, please send an e-mail to:  SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com. Or take the poll below and I will send in the results at the end of the year.  This is a chance to let your opinion be known!

My customers tell me they need less chlorine to meet water quality standards after I remove the sediment from water storage thanks and towers.  Sediment enters the tank one particle at a time and eventually accumulates enough for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to use it as a habitat, grow and become a serious health

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

problem.  If proper inspections are not done to determine sediment levels, corrective action is seldom, if ever, taken.  My opinion is that potable water storage facilities should be inspected inside and out every year, and a cleaning program to assure tanks and towers are cleaned every 3 to 5 years should be in place on all tanks.  What do you think?

Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

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Sediment being removed from the floor of a potable water storage tank by a dive crew.

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system.   Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC:  “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Click Here to see the map:  NUMBER OF CASE-REPORTS OF PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS CAUSED BY NAEGLERIA FOWLERI

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

 

Ron Perrin

         Ron Perrin

Ron Perrin is the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over six thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at www.ronperrin.com.

Debi Wheelan Office Manager

Debi Wheelan

For a free proposal to clean and inspect your potable water storage tanks and towers please call Debi at 817-377-4899.

or e-mail  tankinspections@aol.com

 

We offer potable water tank inspections and cleaning.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry providing state-of-the-art inspections with remote underwater cameras.  Our inspection reports are the best in the industry, covering all state requirements for water tank and tower inspection and meeting all AWWA guidelines.  Our inspections cover over 30 inspection points.  Digital photography documents the condition of your tank, and our narrated underwater video lets you see first-hand what the inside roof walls and floor areas of the tank look like.

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For those experiencing an EPA total coliform violation, our underwater inspections are a perfect place to start assessing your problem. Should accumulated sediment be found in the tank, our potable water dive crew can offer a cleaning solution that may be the only step needed to satisfy the Revised Total Coliform Rule requirement to take action.  Accumulated tank sediment can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and other contaminants.  Removing the sediment is often the only step required to comply with the Revised Total Coliform Rule**, in fact, our customers tell us time after time that their chlorine costs were significantly reduced after the tank was cleaned.

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Diving in potable water is an art.  Unlike offshore divers, potable water divers must be able to enter the water system without disrupting sediment on the floor of the tanks.  Our divers are sealed in a dry suit so no part of their body touches the water.  They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet AWWA and state standards.  The diver is then free to go into the confined space inside the water storage tanks. Underwater, the diver can do a more detailed inspection, or clean the loose sediment from the floor of the tank.

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We are here to help you get it done!  We offer the most choices for your inspection needs:

*Remote underwater camera (drop camera)

*ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle (specially designed and only used in potable water)

*Diver inspection – For the most detail

*Basic state requirements covered with, or without, photos to meet budget needs

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We have served over 500 water utilities since 1997.  Our customers include municipalities, prisons, universities and military bases.  They all have one thing in common – they wanted comprehensive documentation about the status of their water tank, with no water loss and no disruption in service.

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For more information about in-service tank inspections and cleaning, please see our primary web site at: www.ronperrin.com .

Or call 888-481-1768 for a free no obligation quote.

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**On February 13, 2013, EPA published in the Federal Register the revisions to the 1989 TCR.  EPA anticipates greater public   health protection under the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requirements.  The RTCR:

  • Requires public water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems; and
  • Establishes criteria for systems to qualify for and stay on reduced monitoring, which could reduce water system burden and provide incentives for better system operation.
  • Click here for more information about the RTCR.

Assessment and Corrective Action required under RTCR

Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.  Lets talk about Assessment and Corrective action.

Under the RTCR, there is no longer a monthly maximum contaminant level (MCL) violation for multiple total coliform detections.  New revisions require systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system to assess the problem and take corrective action that may reduce cases of illnesses and deaths due to potential fecal contamination and waterborne pathogen exposure.   The rule says “The Distribution System”  of course, what that means is,  “The Water Utility Manager or Operator” is now required to assess the problem and take corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.

Getting started assessing the problem:

A tank inspection may be the best place to start with the assessment.  Is the vent screen in place?  Are there birds or insects in the tank?  There are at least 12 steps to a water tank inspection and at least one of them should be to get a look inside the facility to see if there is sediment on the floor of the tank.  Over time, sediment will build up on the floor area of almost all water storage tanks and towers.  One to three inches is not uncommon here in Texas. Sediment is known to be a habitat for bacteria, protozoa and viruses.  Inspection contractors can offer great documentation of the interior condition of water storage tanks with no disruption in water utility service.  Using remotely operated cameras, inspection robots, or even potable water divers, high tech contractors can deliver great information about the water storage tank or tower.  For information on in-service Water Tank and Tower Inspections, see our inspection page at www.ronperrin.com. For tips on doing your own potable water tank or tower inspection, see: Do your own potable Water Tank Inspection at:  THE TANK DIVER blog.

Corrective action may be as simple as basic housekeeping.  If you know the facility has never been cleaned there is more than a good chance sediment inside the structure needs to be removed.  Again, a qualified diving contractor can save time, water and money by removing all loose sediment with minimal water loss or disruption in service.  For more information on using a Potable Water Dive Crew to clean your potable water tank or tower see our cleaning page: www.ronperrin.com/cleaning

Our tank cleaning customers tell us time and again that their chlorine use was significantly reduced after we cleaned their facility.   With regular inspections and cleanings your likelihood of a coliform contamination are greatly reduced,  if not completely eliminated.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Sediment sample

Sediment samples

To request a tank inspection or cleaning quote, call Ron Perrin Water Technologies toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

Deadly amoeba found in a U.S. drinking water system

August 2013, the death of a 4-year-old boy staying near Violet, Louisiana, was linked to the naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a slip and slide connected to the St. Bernard Parish’s water system that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba.

More common in Australia NBC news reported that this was the first case in the U.S.

For more see: “Four year old’s Death linked to Rare Amoeba in Water System”

Keeping the city’s potable water storage tanks and towers clean may be more important now than ever!

Over time almost all tanks accumulate sediment on the floor. Any amount of sediment can become a habitat for bacteria, protozoa (like Cryptosporidium) and viruses. However, when tests show chlorine depletion, the idea of removing the sediment is usually not thought of. Additional treatment chemicals are usually the first line of defense, quickly becoming chemical warfare and potentially leaving the tank with low, or no, chlorine protection for long periods. American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that potable water storage tanks be cleaned every 3 to five years. Few states actually require tanks to be cleaned on a regular basis, and some don’t require it at all.

When a contaminant (bacteria, protozoa or viruses) enters a water storage tank and finds sediment to get a foothold in, chlorine can be quickly depleted while the contaminants grow under the protection of the sediment. Even otherwise harmless bacteria can help to deplete chlorine reserves leaving the tank vulnerable to more dangerous contaminants.

Removing sediment from the floor of potable water storage tanks greatly reduces the chance that any contaminant can get a foothold in the distribution system and grow to become a larger problem.

So why isn’t cleaning potable water storage tanks a common practice? Removing tanks from service to perform cleaning is time consuming and expensive. The smaller the water utility, the more difficult it is to find the budget for preventive maintenance.  There are many contractors that offer Potable Water Dive crews that can remove floor sediment with little or no down time and minimal water loss. Using a qualified potable water dive crew to clean water storage tanks can save the water utility time and water.

Keeping potable water storage tanks free of accumulated sediment is essential for the health of the system and the health of your customers. If you administer a drinking water system, make a plan to schedule cleanings and stick to it.

References:

For more information on Potable Water Divers see:  www.ronperrin.com

For more information on Naegleria fowleri amoeba in drinking water see:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/public-water-systems.html

NOTE: You cannot be infected with Naegleria fowleri by drinking contaminated water. In very rare instances, Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or contaminated tap water) enters the nose. (For example: when people submerge their heads or cleanse their noses during religious practices, and when people irrigate their sinuses (nose) using contaminated tap water.)

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 

Cryptosporidium Drinking Water Health Advisory  EPA  March 2001

Underwater Services offered to U.S. Water Systems

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in potable water tank & tower inspection. We offer 3 different water tank & tower inspections. All of these inspections provide digital photos of inspection points and problem areas along with an underwater DVD so you can see the interior roof and floor of your water storage tank with no water loss or disruption in service. We take pride in offering you the most information for the least cost. 

Our potable water dive team is available to clean sediment from the floor of your water storage tanks, set plugs, and offer other underwater services.

Field Tech Inspecting a water tower

Field Tech Inspecting a water tower

Other than underwater inspections with a remote camera, cleaning of potable water storage tanks is our most popular Underwater Service.Diver enters water tower.

Water Storage Tank Cleaning VideoSince 1997, we have worked for over 500 water utilities in over 8 U.S. states and Internationally in Mexico.

To date our International underwater services has only been to inspect fire protection systems for American corporations with plants in Mexico.We are looking forward to offering more international diving services in the future.-Visit our web page at www.ronperrin.com

The USEPA is Facing Big Cuts

An article published by WATERONLINE reports that the U.S. EPA is being cut to the bone. Drinking water regulators that were already stretched thin will simply not have the resources they need to enforce drinking water regulations designed to protect the public. The EPA is being systematically deconstructed, it is more political than ever, but with everything else that is going on in Washington who even notices this?

Public safety demands that water regulations like the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) be enforced.

The WATERONLINE ARTICLE By David Coursen, Environmental Protection Network, goes into detail about the cuts:

“More than 27 million Americans are served by community water systems that do not fully meet health-based drinking water standards. Many community water systems draw their water from surface waters, but nearly half a million square miles of such waters fail to meet one or more standards for water quality, and the list is growing each year.

U.S. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says that unsafe drinking water, not climate change, is the world’s greatest environmental challenge. So it should be no surprise that EPA’s budget proclaims “clean and safe water” as a central agency goal.

What is surprising is that the EPA budget proposes jaw-dropping cuts of $1.4 billion from water protection and restoration programs.”  READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE HERE.

We Clean Water Storage Tanks

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been cleaning water storage tanks and towers.  If you are a water utility official please call us for a free quote today,

817-377-4899.

Got UGLY TANK?

Concrete Tank Cleaning. We now offer pressure washing service for ground tanks. Please give us a call for a free quote.
817-377-4899.

 

High Pressure Wash with Certified Lift Operator
After Wash

Have you cleaned your water storage tanks lately?

Multiple USEPA White papers have documented that bacteria, protozoa and even viruses can use the sediment that accumulates on the floor of water storage tanks as a habitat to grow and become a problem in water systems. One of these papers was published on June17, 2002. Titled

Health Risks From Microbial Growth and Biofilms in Drinking Water Distribution Systems”

Many studies have identified microbes in accumulated sediments, including both pathogens and non-pathogens. These include bacteria, viruses, protozoa, algae, fungi and invertebrates. Opportunistic pathogens that have been detected, and can multiply in sediments, include Legionella and mycobacteria (van der Kooij, 2000). Some primary pathogens can also survive for some time in sediments. Hepatitis A virus survived more than four months in sediments at both 5/C and 25/C (Sobsey et al., 1986). Other opportunistic pathogens found in sediments include Pseudomonas fluorescens and Flavobacterium spp. (Berger et al., 1993). Sediments can also release nutrients into the water which stimulate biofilm growth downstream (LeChevallier, 1999b).

The paper explains there is steady inflow of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, nematodes, and other microorganisms enter the distribution system.

We often find that some of the deepest sediment is found in the smaller storage tanks. Our cleaning service is priced right. We clean tanks from 3,000 to 30 million gallons. Give us a call at 817-377-4899 and we will give you a proposal designed for your specific tank.

Have you cleaned your water storage tanks lately?

Water Tank and Tower Cleaning is our specialty

Potable Water Diver Entering Storage Tank

 

Out-of-Sight, Out-of-Mind.

It is amazing how many water utility professionals do not understand the threat of sediment build up in the interior of water storage tanks. Potable water tanks and towers accumulate sediment over the years they are in service. We often see tanks (weekly) that have never been cleaned. The EPA has documented that sediment in a storage tank may become a habitat for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses. Keeping your storage tanks clean should be a scheduled procedure for every water system. Unfortunately, the smaller water utility systems with fewer resources are where we see the most need. Tanks in smaller systems are much more likely to go longer between cleanings, or just never be cleaned at all. Check out our web site: www.ronperrin.com

TOWER CLEANING

Our crew is at our best cleaning and inspecting water storage tanks and towers.

If your tanks have not been inspected this year please call for a free quote. We offer diver, ROV or a lower cost underwater camera option.  We are sure to have a comprehensive inspection that is right for you.  Call today 817-377-4899.

Check out our new web site at www.rpwt.us