Welcome to our New Diver

Brent Aycock Certified Commercial Diver

Brent Aycock is our newest dive team member. Brent is a Graduate of CDA Technical Institute in Jacksonville, FL. Brent is a former Marine assigned to Amphibious Reconnaissance. He is also a Licensed USCG Boat Captain and graduate of United States Coast Guard Maritime Academy in San Diego CA.

We are very happy to welcome Brent Aycock to our Dive Team!

If you are looking for a career that is more than just another Job please contact us. Our dive roster is currently full but we are planning to run a second dive team in 2022. If you are a qualified diver in the North Texas area let’s get to know each other!  Please send your resume and cover letter to PerrinSales@gmail.com

Diver Employment

Do you live in or near north-central Texas? We are taking an application for a commercial diver to join our potable water dive team. Extra points if you have any experience working for a water utilities. We are also taking applications for a water tank inspection technician. Experience working in the water utilities or regulatory industry is required. Both positions require current physical and the ability to safely climb water storage tanks and towers. Travel is required typically 3-4 days a week. Starting pay is $120 to $160 per day (about $16 to $20 per hour). We work year-round, great entry-level diver position Email Resumes & Dive School Certificate to: perrinsales@gmail.com

For more information and to download an application click here: EMPLOYMENT PAGE

Web site: www.ronperrin.com Video Blog: www.taptalk.blog

Potable WATER Tank HELP WANTED

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Potable WATER TANK DIVER WANTED

ESTABLISHED WATER TANK AND TOWER INSPECTION AND CLEANING COMPANY is seeking a commercial diver. Good criminal history and driving record is required.

PAID- Out of town travel is required on both positions (typically 3-4 days per week).

Line Air Dive Training is Required. Commercial Diver Experience is preferred.
Fall protection and confined space training are required and may be provided free of charge for the right individual. CURRENT SCUBA, CPR Certification and recent diving physical are required, preference given to ADCI Certified Diver.

We currently have a TANK INSPECTOR Position open.  Must be able to climb water tanks and water towers.  We will train, you will learn how to inspect water tanks with remote video cameras, remotely operated vehicles (ROV). We will also train you on how to clean water tanks with an underwater robot.  Will also be working with dive crew as needed.

Top PAY for experience. E-mail resume with salary history.

Key Responsibilities:
Work underwater and above water with a Dive Team of 3 – 4 commercially certified divers. Efficiently and effectively perform water tank and tower inspections and the removal of tank sediment from the floor of water storage tanks. Must be able to climb 100-200 foot ladders. Must be fit and able to carry gear bags up to 80 pounds.

Working Conditions:

Love of working outdoors is essential and the willingness to work in bad weather conditions. (i.e. rain, high humidity and heat).

Required to work a minimum of 35 hours per week for FT position.
Able to work occasional weekends and overtime as needed.

Employment is year round. Pay based on experience. Pre-employment drug screening is required. This position requires frequent out of town travel, paid by company (from Fort Worth, Texas). Please e-mail resume and use “Resume” on subject line.

Check out what my past employees have to say here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFaumm-X_8k

Also, look at and LIKE our company Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech/

Call 817-377-4899 (voice only) to schedule interview M-F 8 to 5.

Top Ten Reasons to clean your potable water storage tanks in 2021

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow GiardiaLegionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tank and tower cleaning rates are affordable and we have special pricing for tiny tanks under 10,000 gallons.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

Check out our new video series on YouTube. Tap-Talk explores our water distribution systems as we take you along and let you see what we see as we inspect and clean municipal water storage tanks. Our cameras let you see what is inside, we never reveal the utility we are working for or our exact location unless our customer gives us permission. Episode #1 is posted below, less than six minutes, I explain what we do and how we do it, talk about my background and what led me to start my company in 1997.

Episode Two:

There is a serious danger lurking in many water systems. Join me, along with microbiologists and a former EPA drinking water chief as they discuss the problem. If you like this video please give us a thumbs up and SHARE it! It is important that water utility managers understand the importance of keeping water storage tanks clean. PLEASE SHARE!

Episode Three:

Wallie is a Deep Trekker DT640VAC robot crawler we use to clean water storage tanks that have deep water. The Deep Trekker DT640 robot crawler can work it water up to 165 feet deep. To see more check out our blog at http://www.tankdiver.us. To contact our office please call 817-377-4899 or contact Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com

Want More? This video is a 15 minute look back at some of the jobs we have done over the past three years.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899 or

e-mail Robert Perrin at perrinsales@gmail.com

Our Best Photo of 2020

Since 1997 we have been inspecting and cleaning potable water storage tanks and towers. Our crews take hundreds and often over a thousand photos a week. Of course, most are a little on the boring side documenting the inspection points of water tanks and towers. Occasionally we turn the cameras on ourselves as we do the work and those are the photos I use to promote our service.

Every time I see this photo I think about how it nails down what we do. I think it was the best of 2020. It is one of our divers cleaning a GST potable water storage facility. The tanks are always a lot cleaner when we are done, about half way through you can see a lot of sediment on the floor and less that perfectly clear water, it is a real working photo, not something produced in perfect pool water conditions.

Here are some other photos I found to be impressive in 2020 I hope you like them too.

Our Favorite ROBOT Tank Cleaning Photos!

Water Tank Inspection. Water Tank Cleaning.

KEEPING DRINKING WATER SAFE

Our goal is to get people thinking about their water, and allow utility officials to understand the choices they have when it comes to inspecting and cleaning potable water storage tanks and towers. 

For more information about our inspection or cleaning services See: www.watertankinspection.com

Be sure to subscribe to our new video series Tap Talk at: www.taptalk.blog

Like our FaceBook page at: https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

Contact Information: Phone 817-377-4899 E-mail perrinsales@gmail.com

Tap Talk: What’s in Your Water? Ep. 3-

It is Friday, so it must be time for number three in our “Tap Talk” series. “Tap Talk” will explore what we typically find in municipal drinking water tanks and why keeping water tanks clean is important. There is a serious danger lurking in America’s water systems. Join me, (Ron Perrin), along with microbiologists and a former EPA employee, Len Pardee, as we discuss the problem. This episode takes a look at robot cleaning of water tanks, take a few minutes and check it out and leave a comment.

WALLIE is our Deep Trekker DT640VAC robot crawler we use to clean water storage tanks like the standpipe behind me that have deep water. The Deep Trekker DT640 robot crawler can work in water up to 165 feet deep. Today we are going to take you to several different standpipe tanks so you can see him work. Be sure to subscribe to this blog to see our next post. You cal also see all videos at www.taptalk.blog.

Keeping tanks clean is very important, but before you can fix a problem you must know it exists. Water tank inspections are essential to properly manage any municipal water system. Big or small, if you do not know there is a problem with your water system, you can not make plans to take care of it. Sediment builds up in almost all water systems over time. Sediment on the floor of the tank can be a breeding ground for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and a host of other contaminants. In some tanks this soft sedimentation becomes a safe habitat where contaminants can grow protected from the chlorine and other treatment chemicals. As billions of bacteria form in the sediment treatment chemicals can be depleted, causing utilities to use more and more until they reach, or exceed, legal limits.

Simple tank cleaning remains the best solution.

Tap Talk: What’s in Your Water? Ep. 2-

Be sure to check out number two in our new video series. “Tap Talk” will explore what we typically find in municipal drinking water tanks and why keeping water tanks clean is important. There is a serious danger lurking in America’s water systems. Join me, (Ron Perrin), along with microbiologists and a former EPA employee, Len Pardee, as we discuss the problem.

For several years we have been working on a feature length documentary with the working title, “Out of sight, Out of mind – What is in your water”. This episode features parts from that film. Keeping tanks clean is very important, but before you can fix a problem you must know it exists. Water tank inspections are essential to properly manage any municipal water system. Big or small, if you do not know there is a problem with your water system, you can not make plans to take care of it. Sediment builds up in almost all water systems over time. Sediment on the floor of the tank can be a breeding ground for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and a host of other contaminants. In some tanks this soft sedimentation becomes a safe habitat where contaminants can grow protected from the chlorine and other treatment chemicals. As billions of bacteria form in the sediment treatment chemicals can be depleted, causing utilities to use more and more until they reach, or exceed, legal limits.

Simple tank cleaning remains the best solution.

Water Tank & Tower Inspection and Cleaning

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers. We are based out of Fort Worth, Texas with personnel that also call Houston home.

We work in over a dozen states with the bulk of our customers located in Texas. We offer the most information for the lowest possible cost. Our most popular inspection uses a remote underwater camera. With this close look below the waterline we are able to give our customers a first hand look at their water storage facilities with no disruption in service.

For a free quote call 817-377-4899, use the free quote form on the right side of this blog or e-mail a list of your tanks to perrinsales@gmail.com.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. may also be reached toll free at: 1-888-481-1768

Tank inspection camera
water tank inspection camera (C) 2010 Ron Perrin Water Technologies

In addition to our remote camera inspection we also offer a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) inspection and for the most detail our potable water diver crew is available.

Water Tank Inspection ROV
DEEP TREKKER ROV (c) 2014 Ron Perrin

All of our inspections cover all AWWA and State inspection requirements documented with photos of each inspection point a video that covers the exterior and interior roof and underwater areas. The remote underwater camera also called a drop camera inspection is a excellent inspection tool for smaller and mid-sized water storage facilities. The ROV is useful when specific areas need to be looked at or to get to the rear of larger facilities.

The dive crew may be the best choice if a more detailed report is needed or if additional work is needed such as tank cleaning or leek repair. We have a new service that was developed exclusively for standpipe type water storage tanks. Standpipe tanks have deeper water than most other tanks making it extremely hazardous for divers. Our cleaning robot offers a unique way to remove sediment and allow your tank to stay in-service. See our other blog post for more information and photos.

Ron Perrin Potable Water Diver Photo (c) 2020 RonPerrin.us

Pricing is quick and free, simply give us a call toll free at 1-888-481-1768. If you prefer using a fax just fax a list of your tanks to 817-246-1740. Be sure to include exactly what type of inspection you would like us to quote. We will need to know the gallon size of the tanks and if they are GST, EST, clear-wells (underground) or standpipe type.

If you prefer to email your request send it to perrinsales@gmail.com.

Congratulations to ROBERT PERRIN, SSH

Robert Perrin, SSH is celebrating 10 years at Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. Robert became our Safety Manager in 2014 after earning his Specialist in Safety and Health (SSH) certification from the Environmental Training Institute at UTA. Robert is also our ROV operator and works in sales when he is not in the field. Robert has been doing a great job at our company and I hope he is around for 20 more years!

If you would like to talk about inspecting or cleaning a water storage tank connect with Robert on e-mail: perrinsales@gmail.com or call 817-377-4899

Diving into Drinking Water

We had another great day Diving.

Our thing is to inspect and clean potable water tanks (Drinking Water). We use underwater cameras to make quick work out of tank and tower inspections. If the tank has sediment in the interior floor our potable water dive crew suits up in a dry suit and commercial dive hat so no part of the diver’s body touches the water supply. They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet EPA standards for diving into potable water.

Over time sediment builds up in most water storage tanks, sediment may be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, and even viruses. Keeping tanks clean and free of sediment is one of the most effective ways to keep water safe to drink. If your system would like a free quote give us a call at 817-377-4899.

Meet Wallie Our Standpipe Cleaning Robot

“Wallie” is our DT640 VAC Deep Trekker Crawler Robot that we have purchased to clean standpipes. Standpipes typically have deeper water than other potable water storage tanks, with water depth often over 100 feet. Wallie can operate safely in water up to 168 feet deep. This will be a big asset to water utilities that do not want to take their standpipe out of service to remove the sediment from the floor of the tank.

It is important to keep potable water storage tanks and towers clean. Sediment builds up over time. A layer of sediment in your water storage tank or tower may allow bacteria, protozoa, viruses or other organisms to get a foothold in your water storage tank, grow, and become a community health problem.

Keeping your tank clean will also save you money! Our customers report that they use less chlorine to meet water quality standards after we clean their storage facility.

Since 1997, Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in underwater inspections and tank cleanings. We offer a wider range of inspection and cleaning choices depending on your needs. Our underwater inspections may be performed with a Remote Underwater Video Camera, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), or for the most detail, we also offer a Diver Inspection. We have a Small Tank Cleaning Service for tanks from 1,000 to 10,000 gallons, Robot Cleaning for Standpipes and our Potable Water Dive Crew is a good fit for most other facilities. Call today for a free quote: 1-888-481-1768.

(c) Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. 2020 www.ronperrin.us

After the Storm

All Potable Water Tanks should be Inspected. This may not be the first thing water utilities think about after severe storms. With damage to utility offices and vehicles, the potable water storage tanks and towers are often overlooked. If you need your tanks and towers inspected we are here to help. Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been inspecting tanks and towers since 1997. We use underwater video cameras so there is no disruption in your utility water service. Call 1-888-481-1768 or see www.ronperrin.us for more details.

NEW VIDEO PODCAST Series – TAP TALK, WHAT IS IN YOUR DRINKING WATER?

In our new video series Tap-Talk where we discuss what is really in your water system. For years we have been working on a feature-length documentary film. Our working title is “Out of Sight- Out of Mind, what’s in your water?” This video POD series will tap into some of the things that we found along the way as we continue to put this important film together. We will take you into public water systems like no one else has, as we inspect and clean municipal water tanks and towers with remote underwater cameras and commercially trained divers. This video is the introduction.

For a free water tank inspection or cleaning quote call toll free 1-888-481-1768 or e-mail Robert Perrin at perrinsales@gmail.com.

We Are All in This Together

Being a human being like most of you, I have political opinions and feelings like everyone else. I try to separate my personal feelings from my business life but that is getting harder to do all the time.

Potable water tank cleaning

Keeping your tanks clean may be more important now than ever. Sediment on the floor of your water storage tank may become an inviting habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to get a foothold in your water system.

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been here to help water utilities inspect and clean water storage tanks and towers. We work for everyone, every type of person with every kind of skin tone and all political stripes with equal enthusiasm. Some I agree with and some I don’t, but since I am not a politician, how my customers think is not my business.

Lately, I have had to unfriend some folks because of the hate speech they have been posting or re-posting on face-book. I do not have time for hate in my life. You may not see the world as I do and we can agree to disagree on just about everything, but I draw the line at posting hate.

Water tank & tower inspection and cleaning
Water tank & tower inspection and cleaning

Recently, even wearing a mask during a pandemic has gotten politicized. For months I have been posting photos of my crew and me wearing masks. This is not political. It is a practical way for my company to keep helping water utility companies keep their water tanks and towers inspected and clean.

If you have contact with the public in any way you should wear a mask. I hope this gets understood by everyone sooner rather than later. No matter what or how you think, we are all in this together and the sooner we come together, the sooner we will stop the spread of Covid-19.

Dig deep into your wealth of compassion for your fellow man and wear a mask in public. It doesn’t matter if you’re red or blue – it just matters that you did your part to stop the spread!

Water Tower Inspection and Cleaning

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Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers.

Water Tower cleaning.

Sediment removal from water tower.

We serve municipal water utilities, federal parks and prisons and private industry. We deploy underwater cameras or remotely operated vehicles to perform inspections of drinking water tanks.

Our methods save our customers millions of gallons of treated drinking water every year.  If the facility needs to be cleaned our potable water dive team can remove tank sediment with minimal water loss and little to no disruption in service.

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow Giardia, Legionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tower cleaning rates start at only $2,450.00. Affordable protection for your water storage tanks affordable safety for the people you serve.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

We are here when you need us!

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry.  We use remotely operated underwater video cameras to get the most information for the lowest possible cost. We are able to inspect your tanks inside and out with no water loss or disruption in service.

Diver.Entry.March.2020 copy

If your water tank or tower needs to be cleaned our potable water dive crew can remove all loose sediment from the floor of the facility with minimal water loss. Give us a call at 817-377-4899 for a free quote. Check out and like our Facebook page facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

EARTH DAY 2020

Today is Earth Day.  Every year on April 22, trees are planted, litter is cleaned up, and awareness for the issues plaguing the planet are raised, in honor of the holiday, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2020.  The first Earth Day was on April 22, 1970. Environmentalists took to the streets with concerned citizens and pop culture icons, like poet Allen Ginsberg, who were asked to speak on behalf of Mother Earth.

The 1970s saw the passage of the most comprehensive environmental legislation in U.S. history, including the Clean Air Act, the Water Quality Improvement Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act, and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. In addition, just eight months after the first Earth Day, Richard Nixon approved the creation of a new organization tasked with monitoring the nation’s natural assets: the Environmental Protection Agency. You can find more facts about earth day at DO Something . ORG.

 I manage a company that spends every day inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers.  Our goal is to save treated drinking water by performing required inspections without draining storage tanks.  We use underwater cameras that allow us to enter the water system, inspect the tank, and produce a comprehensive report on its condition without disrupting water service.  Over the years our “no water loss” inspections have saved tens of millions of gallons of treated drinking water.

Earth Day makes me think about what could be and how we could do more. In 2019 we inspected 651 potable water storage tanks and towers, but we only cleaned 105 of them. and that is a very typical year.  Even on one of our best years in 2017 we inspected 863 facilities but only cleaned 95.   There were hundreds more that needed to be cleaned but the decision was made not to clean the tank.

To understand why we only clean a fraction of the tanks that need to be cleaned and why that is a big deal, I need to give you a brief explanation of how water systems work.  Your drinking water comes from ground water (aquifers), or from rivers and lakes (surface water).  The most common disinfectant used is chlorine if it is from surface water it is also processed through different media at a water treatment plant.  After the water has been processed it is pumped into a storage facility like a ground storage tank tank (GST), or an elevated storage tank (EST), where it sits and waits until you use it at your tap (60 Second Video Click here).

A few states have rules that require water storage facilities to be inspected every year but very few require tanks to be cleaned. Texas Administrative Code 290.46 (M)(1) requires all potable water tanks to be inspected inside and out annually.  I guess it was assumed that when the inspection showed the interior floor was covered with sediment the utility would take action to keep it clean.  That is not what is happening.  Water regulations that keep us safe are much too complex for this article. The short answer is, as long as water testing is negative for coliform the water is deemed to be safe.  Coliform is what is looked for to determine if microbes can live in the water.  When it is not found the water is deemed safe to drink.  About 7 years ago new rules under the  Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) required some additional monitoring of total coliform’s and E. coli.

There are now also requirements for assessments and corrective action when monitoring results show that public water systems (PWS) may be vulnerable to contamination.

In this case if no other breach can be found a good look at the water storage tank would meet the requirements for an additional assessment.  If the results of the inspection showed that sediment was covering the floor of the tank, cleaning the tank could be the corrective action needed. Unfortunately, the complexity of the Revised Total Coliform Rule does not result in most tanks not being cleaned.  In Texas, tank inspections are required but tank cleaning is often put off due to budget constraints or because those responsible don’t understand the dangers that can lurk in sediment.

The problem is as simple as a game of Hide & Seek.  When conducting the required water testing a sample of water is taken from a tap on, or near, the water tank.  Coliform must be found in the water to know there is a problem.  Only a few feet away sediment on the floor of the tank may be hiding the contamination.  A host of undetected microbes including bacteria, protozoa and even viruses, can use the tank sediment to get a foothold in the tank. Often left undisturbed for years, these contaminants continue to grow until they overpower the disinfectant in the tank.  They can then be detected through required water monitoring but the damage is already done.  The water system is compromised when testing finds too much Coliform in the system. Then boiled water notices are sent out to protect public health.

IMG_20200422_125907

Sediment covering the floor of water storage tanks is a breach.  It is as bad as a hole in the roof.  Sediment can let almost any microbe or parasite that may have just passed through get a foothold in the water system, grow and become a public health problem.

Tank inspections are required in some states. However, even in those states tank cleanings still require a sales pitch unless the water system is compromised and testing finds too much Coliform in the system.  That is often when we get the call.

Many well managed and well funded water utilities keep their water tanks and towers cleaned.  This is why I came up with the tag line “Your zip code should not determine your water quality”.  The fact is, like many other things in life, where you live affects almost everything, but it should not affect your water quality in the United States. Smaller systems that are not well-funded just need additional information about why keeping water tanks clean makes such a big difference.  When tanks are clean the cost of disinfectants like chlorine goes down. The system is healthier and less likely to get a RTCR violation.  In this case doing the right thing actually saves money and makes maintaining regulations easier.

This small, overlooked part of the world affects millions of people.  Keeping tanks clean is just basic housekeeping and should be the standard at every public water utility.  Unfortunately, it is not the first thing thought of when violations occur.  The knee-jerk reaction is to add more disinfectants. However, when the maximum residual is reached, the decision is often made to change disinfectants.  This just adds up to more time and money wasted if the tanks have not been properly inspected or kept clean.  

Thanks for staying with me this far.  This is where I decided to DO SOMETHING.

The Ron Perrin Clean Water Tank Project Inc. was established to educate water utility managers about the importance of keeping tanks clean.  Help me get water utility managers to think about cleaning storage tanks FIRST instead of Last or not at all! We are producing a documentary, promoting our blog and creating literature on the importance of keeping tanks clean. Our non-profit is registered and can be supported through the SMILE program at AmazonSmile.  Search for the “Ron Perrin Clean Water Tank Project Inc.” and you can round up the change on your Amazon Purchase to allow us to get the change and help us DO SOMETHING that needs doing.  Together we can make a change by improving water quality for more people.

AmazonSmile – You shop. Amazon gives.
When you shop at smile.amazon.com, Amazon donates to your favorite charity.

Why Isn’t ChlorineTreatment Enough?

I had some water utility workers ask me, “Why isn’t chlorine treatment of potable water enough to keep water safe? Why should we worry about cleaning tanks when we already use chlorine?”

Chlorine works great as long as there is not a breach in the tank. When there is a breach like a hole in the top that lets birds and insects inside the tank, the chlorine can not keep up. This is why annual tank inspections are so important. People have died from this scenario, see: “Salmonella Outbreak in Alamosa, Colorado“. According to USEPA officials a sediment build up on the interior floor of a water storage tank is another type of breach. Bacteria like Legionella, protozoa like Cryptosporidium, and a wide range of viruses including Norovirus can hide and GROW in the tank sediment.

Do you know what the #1 cause of municipal water contamination is? According to the CDC it is a microscopic parasite called Giardia. The sediment becomes a perfect habitat providing both shelter and food for Giardia and many other microorganisms to grow. In time, the contaminants can reach a point where they overwhelm chlorine or any other disinfectant you may be using. Keeping tanks clean keeps your drinking water safe.

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

For a complete listing of water-related surveillance data, see CDC’s Surveillance Reports for Drinking Water-associated Disease & Outbreaks.

A professional potable water Dive Crew can remove tank sediment along with everything that is growing in it with minimal water loss.  The diver is sealed in a DRY suit so there is no human contact with the water supply.  He can then enter the tank and make quick work of removing tank sediment and any contaminant that may be hiding in it.  Give us a call toll free at 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

For more information on Municipal Water Tank Cleaning see: Ron Perrin Water Technologies web Site: www.rpwt.us.

Content source: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Inspecting Water Storage since 1997

As we are getting close to the end of 2019, it seems to be the time of the year when we look back at where we have been.  Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers in Texas and 14 other states.  We have learned a lot over the years and we still strive to deliver the best services at the lowest prices. One of the ways we do that is by limiting our contracting to what we are very good at, and that is inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers.  If you are one of our customers we would like to say THANK YOU!  If you are looking for an inspection contractor give us a call and see why our customers call us back year after year. .

Ron.Perrin.2019

Call toll free: 1-888-481-1768Ron.

 

Fire Suppression Tank Inspection and Cleaning – NFPA 25

NFPA 25 – Fire Suppression Tank Inspection and Cleaning.

NFPA code 25 is the requirement under the National Fire Prevention Association for fire protection tanks to be inspected at least once every five years.

Insurance coverage is often based on compliance of NFPA codes and standards. Our inspections allow you to meet NFPA 25 requirements without draining your water storage tanks or towers.  You never need to lose your fire protection with our inspection service – you are always ready for an effective response in a fire emergency.

We have three tank inspection methods depending on your needs:

Remote underwater video camera

Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV)

Diver inspection and cleaning service

Call our office at 817-377-4899 to get a free quote.

Water Tank Inspection – Shopping for a Potable Water Tank Inspector? Think about This-

Here are a few things to consider when shopping for a contractor to perform work in a potable water storage tank.

  1. Look for a specialist
  2. Check photos on their web site
  3. Check references
  4. Require an insurance certificate
  5. Proper training for employees performing work

Specialist: We live in an age of specialist.  As a rule Specialist know their topic inside and out.  When contracting a company to enter your potable water system it is better to deal with a contractor who is focused on entering potable water systems.  Companies who do nothing but service potable water systems are more likely to have equipment only used in potable water system.  Specialist in potable water work are also more likely to have disinfection procedures and a disinfection solution that meets AWWA standards.  When it is your business to do it you are just more likely to do it right.

Photos: No matter what you see on advertisements, or told on the phone, a quick check of a companie’s web site can quickly show you what their focus is on.  Many diving contractors are simply focused on Diving.  Potable water diving may just be one of the things on their long list of things they do to make money diving.  If the photos on their web sight show diving in lakes, rivers, and streams you need to trust them to somehow clean their equipment enough to enter your water system.  Like they say, a photo is worth a million words. Some contractors say they have reserved equipment they only use in potable water.  However, the photos on their own web site may show they actually use the same gear to do all diving services.  If you can find a company that specializes in potable water diving, the photos on their web site should confirm that claim, not dispute it.

References:  If a company has been working for more than a week or two, they should have references.  Ask for a list of customers that you may be allowed to contact.  Another way to check references is by looking at their company Facebook page, or the owner’s linked-in page.

Insurance:  Ask for a certificate of insurance sent from the companies insurance agent. Do not accept a certificate sent directly from the contractor. It is just too easy to change dates or fabricate the certificate from scratch.  Make sure the contractor has Liability, workers comp and commercial auto.  While they are all important, the workers comp may be the most difficult and expensive for the contractor to acquire.  Climbing and diving into potable water storage tanks and towers is “high risk contracting” by any measure.  If an accident occurs, and the contractor is not covered by his own workers compensation insurance, the customer will be liable for the injured employee.

Training:  High risk contracting may only be done safely if the contractor has required before employment, or taken the time to send each and every employee on the job site proper training.  The majority, if not all diving contractors, require that divers have diving certifications before employment is offered.  Beyond dive training, employees should also have documentation showing they have had both Confined Space and Fall Protection training.

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Photo:  Len Pardee is the Lead Tank Inspector for Ron Perrin Water Technologies.  Len has a degree in Environmental Engineering from Syracuse University. He is retired from the USEPA where he served for 34 years.  Among other posts while at the USEPA, Len was the Chief of the Region 6 Water Division for several years.

At Ron Perrin Water Technologies we take time to make sure the inspectors we send out to perform inspections have the right gear, insurance coverage and training to safely do your inspection or cleaning both efficiently and safely.  By using a state-of-the-art  under- water video camera and lighting system, we are able to collect all the information we need to produce your inspection report  while the tank remains in-service. In addition to the underwater video, our reports also feature dozens of high quality digital photos covering all AWWA inspection points.  Our innovative inspection methods have been refined by Ron Perrin since 1997 and are featured in a class he instructs for the Environmental Training Institute at UT Arlington.  Information on the course may be found at the ETI Website See WTR308 Water Tank Inspection Techniques

For more information see www.rpwt.us. For a water tank inspection or cleaning quote call Debi at 817-377-4899 or e-mail tankinspections@aol.com.

 

The Importance of a Water Tank Inspection

I write a lot about inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks.  My focus is on tanks that store potable water, or more simply, municipal drinking water.  To understand why this is so important you need to understand how water systems work.  The water we drink comes from lakes, rivers, streams or water wells and is also known as ground water.

It is then processed at a water treatment plant, smaller. Systems on well water may simply inject chlorine into the water as it goes into a storage tank.  The larger systems that most of us are on filter and process the water to perfection then send it out into the distribution system where it waits in water storage tanks and towers until it is needed.

The water storage tanks and towers serve two critical functions, they allow enough water to be at the ready so it is always available to us, the end user; it provides enough water pressure to not only get it to your tap, but also keep it safe.  The positive water pressure insures that contaminants will not enter the system.  If there is a line break the system will lose water, the break or leak also allows contaminants to be sucked in.

Any time pressure can not be maintained for any reason the system is at risk and will issue a boil water advisory or order to protect public health. The water storage tanks and towers you see around town are the last stop water makes before being served at your tap.  Water storage tanks on the ground are known as Ground Storage Tanks or GSTs, Water Towers are referred to as Elevated Storage Tanks or ESTs. These facilities have a life span of 30 to over 100 years if properly maintained.

Over time sediment builds up on the floor of GST, and EST, storage facilities. One particle at a time over several years and sometimes over several decades, sediment levels can continue to grow.  The soft sediment can become a nutrient rich habitat that according to the USEPA can support bacteria, protozoa and even viruses.  Sediment can also offer a safe harbor from treatment chemicals. As the sediment grows, more and more chemicals are used in an attempt to meet water quality standards set by the USEPA and enforced by state health or environmental agencies.

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This is why an annual inspection of water storage tanks and towers is so important you can not make plans to fix a problem unless you know you have the problem in the first place.

Inspection contractors often use underwater cameras to get a look at the interior conditions of the facility.  This can be done while the facility remains in service and full of water.  If the tank is found to have sediment potable water divers can be contracted to clean the water tank with minimal water loss.  Removing the layer of sediment on the floor along with all contaminants that may be living in it, this quickly restores the facility to the point that much less chlorine is needed to maintain water quality standards.

 

About our company:

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks while they remain In-Service. Our company is located near Fort Worth, Texas in the DFW area. We serve Texas and fourteen other states including Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Kentucky and Florida. Of course, we inspect more tanks in our home state of Texas than any other state.

We offer three types of underwater in-service tank inspections to better meet your needs: 1) Remote Underwater Camera.  Our underwater remote video camera and lighting system is our most popular and economical inspection method. This allows you to see underwater conditions and get a good look at the floor of the facility.  2) Remotely Operated Vehicle or (ROV).  The ROV water tank inspection is the right choice for larger tanks, the ROV is equipped with motors and is able to swim to the far side of the tank for a better look. 3) Diver Inspection.  Potable Water Divers are dressed out in dry suits and washed down with a chlorine solution to meet AWWA and EPA standards.  The diver is a good choice when you want to get a good look at a specific spot in the tank.  Our most common diver inspection follows our tank cleaning service.  Divers cover the floor of the tank and any problem areas they may see using a high resolution camera and underwater lighting system this is our best inspection and it is free with each tank cleaning.

About the author and owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies.

A former Texas Master Peace officer (1984-2006), Ron Perrin was an avid scuba diver and dove his first water storage tank in 1992.  Forming two separate companies with fellow police officers, Ron became the Director of Operations for U.S. Underwater Services in 1995.  In 1997, Ron established Ron Perrin Water Technologies.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies inspects over 800 water storage tanks a year. The methods Ron has developed to inspect and clean potable water storage tanks and towers have saved millions of gallons of treated drinking water and have improved the quality in hundreds of water systems. In 2013, Ron Perrin became an OSHA outreach trainer and is currently an authorized construction trainer.

In 2015 Ron was contracted by the Environmental Training Institute at the University of Texas at Arlington to develop a training program to safely inspect water storage tanks. WTR 308 Water Storage Inspection Techniques was offered for the first time in the 2015 summer catalog. One of the techniques is the proper use of remote underwater cameras and Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) to inspect water storage tanks and towers.

Office Phone: 817-377-4899   Toll free 1-888-481-1768

E-mail tankinspections@aol.com

Specialist in Safety and health (SSH)                                                2013

Certified Safety and Health Official (CSHO)                                    2014

Safety and Health Environmental Professional (SHEP)               2015

Published Works:

Inspecting and Cleaning Potable Water Storage   (Second Edition Due out in 2020)

By Ron Perrin. 158 page book. SBN 10: 1-4415-3244-7

Municipal Sewer & Water magazine: September 2010 edition; Pages 94-95;

Article title: Look Inside – Inspection & Cleaning of potable water storage tanks

Treatment Plant Operator Magazine: September 2017 edition: Pages 22-23

Article title: Denying Safe Harbor to Pathogens

 Texas Water Utility Journal; August 2014 edition; Pages 20-22 Article title:

Record High Temperatures May Activate Hidden Microbes in Your Water Distribution System–   What’s hiding in your distribution system

Web sites: www.ronperrin.com   http://www.watertankinspection.com

See our ROV Water Tank Inspection Post and Video Here: www.thetankdiver.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

I have posted multiple articles on linked in:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/ron-perrin-40609522

Ron Perrin Television Interview:

POSTED 10:35 PM, MAY 8, 2017, BY CHRIS HAYES,

UPDATED AT 03:24PM, MAY 8, 2017

http://fox2now.com/2017/05/08/town-with-brown-water-has-no-record-of-cleaning-its-water-tower/

Since 2011 I have served on the Educational Advisory Board for The Ocean Corporation commercial diver and ROV educational program.

And last, if you are tasked with inspecting a water storage tank and are not allowed or do not have funds for an inspection contractor click here to see our post on HOW TO INSPECT YOUR OWN WATER STORAGE TANK:

Do Your Own Potable Water Tank Inspection Page

For more information on municipal water tank inspections see:

www.watertankinspection.com

Contact info:

Office Phone: 817-377-4899 Toll free 1-888-481-1768

E-mail: tankinspections@aol.com

 

 

 

Missouri has no requirement to clean water towers

Chris Hayes from Fox2 News in St Louis, Missouri recently interviewed me for a story he did about a water tank in Leadwood, Missouri. The tank had been inspected once about 17 years ago and as far as anyone knew, had never been cleaned. Chris was contacted by some residents of the community who had brown water coming out of their taps.

I was happy to contribute both video and comments to this story. Water storage tanks should be inspected yearly for public safety, even if the state they are in has no regulations at all. Mr. Hayes did a great job. He found the larger systems around St. Louis had all been recently inspected. Many smaller systems seem to fall back on regulations to decide what is really important.

Although the state of Missouri has no written regulation or rules on when tanks should be inspected they do say this about the inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks: “...clearly necessary to protect public health.”

You would not drink out of a dirty glass, why do these people have to drink water from a dirty tank?  See the video on our Company Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech  

BE SURE TO LIKE THE PAGE WHILE YOU ARE THERE!

References:

Missouri Department of Natural Resources
Water Protection Program – Public Drinking Water Branch

Microbial Contamination of Water Storage Tanks Fact Sheet

Inspection of Water Storage Facilities Fact Sheet

USEPA – Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

Health Risks From Microbial Growth and Biofilms in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.  Page: 26 section G, Page 34 section I,

Distribution System Issue Paper. Finished Water Storage Facilities. August 15, 2002. Page 2, 11, and 12.

Total Coliform Rule Issue Paper. Inorganic Contaminant Accumulation in Potable Water Distribution Systems.

Check out our April Newsletter

 

Check out our April 2017 Newsletter:  CLICK HERE
We inspect your facilities with no water loss or
 disruption in service!
Stop by our booth and see our Underwater Inspection
video that saves time, water and money!

We want to be your contracted inspection service!
Call today for free quote 888-481-1786
Our underwater cameras provide the best documentation 
with the lowest cost
and NO DISRUPTION IN SERVICE

Check out our April 2017 Newsletter:  CLICK HERE

On the NEWS with i-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.  

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.

This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

Sediment being removed

Sediment being removed

Safe tap water is something everyone should have.

Crew Prepares for Dive

Crew Prepares for Dive

                                          Click Here to see:    CBS DFW_ VIDEO

 

NEWSsinc.com VIDEO

     SEE THE FULL STORY HERE: 

CBS 11 DFW NEWS STORY  http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

This story aired on 

Thanks for taking the time to check this out.

Photos taken by

RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan

Find us on FACEBOOK  or connect with Ron on Linked-In

Visit my You Tube Channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/RonPerrin for more great videos like these:

THE EPA MAY SOON REQUIRE ALL WATER STORAGE TANKS AND TOWERS TO BE INSPECTED AND CLEANED

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

On October 15th 2014 the EPA held a meeting to decide if there should be a rule to require water storage tanks and towers to be cleaned and inspected.

The webinar is over but the EPA is still taking comments until the end of 2014.  If you would like to make a comment on this issue, please send an e-mail to:  SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com. Or take the poll below and I will send in the results at the end of the year.  This is a chance to let your opinion be known!

My customers tell me they need less chlorine to meet water quality standards after I remove the sediment from water storage thanks and towers.  Sediment enters the tank one particle at a time and eventually accumulates enough for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to use it as a habitat, grow and become a serious health

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

problem.  If proper inspections are not done to determine sediment levels, corrective action is seldom, if ever, taken.  My opinion is that potable water storage facilities should be inspected inside and out every year, and a cleaning program to assure tanks and towers are cleaned every 3 to 5 years should be in place on all tanks.  What do you think?

Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

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Sediment being removed from the floor of a potable water storage tank by a dive crew.

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system.   Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC:  “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Click Here to see the map:  NUMBER OF CASE-REPORTS OF PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS CAUSED BY NAEGLERIA FOWLERI

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

 

Ron Perrin

         Ron Perrin

Ron Perrin is the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over six thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at www.ronperrin.com.

Debi Wheelan Office Manager

Debi Wheelan

For a free proposal to clean and inspect your potable water storage tanks and towers please call Debi at 817-377-4899.

or e-mail  tankinspections@aol.com

 

We offer potable water tank inspections and cleaning.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry providing state-of-the-art inspections with remote underwater cameras.  Our inspection reports are the best in the industry, covering all state requirements for water tank and tower inspection and meeting all AWWA guidelines.  Our inspections cover over 30 inspection points.  Digital photography documents the condition of your tank, and our narrated underwater video lets you see first-hand what the inside roof walls and floor areas of the tank look like.

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For those experiencing an EPA total coliform violation, our underwater inspections are a perfect place to start assessing your problem. Should accumulated sediment be found in the tank, our potable water dive crew can offer a cleaning solution that may be the only step needed to satisfy the Revised Total Coliform Rule requirement to take action.  Accumulated tank sediment can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and other contaminants.  Removing the sediment is often the only step required to comply with the Revised Total Coliform Rule**, in fact, our customers tell us time after time that their chlorine costs were significantly reduced after the tank was cleaned.

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Diving in potable water is an art.  Unlike offshore divers, potable water divers must be able to enter the water system without disrupting sediment on the floor of the tanks.  Our divers are sealed in a dry suit so no part of their body touches the water.  They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet AWWA and state standards.  The diver is then free to go into the confined space inside the water storage tanks. Underwater, the diver can do a more detailed inspection, or clean the loose sediment from the floor of the tank.

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We are here to help you get it done!  We offer the most choices for your inspection needs:

*Remote underwater camera (drop camera)

*ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle (specially designed and only used in potable water)

*Diver inspection – For the most detail

*Basic state requirements covered with, or without, photos to meet budget needs

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We have served over 500 water utilities since 1997.  Our customers include municipalities, prisons, universities and military bases.  They all have one thing in common – they wanted comprehensive documentation about the status of their water tank, with no water loss and no disruption in service.

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For more information about in-service tank inspections and cleaning, please see our primary web site at: www.ronperrin.com .

Or call 888-481-1768 for a free no obligation quote.

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**On February 13, 2013, EPA published in the Federal Register the revisions to the 1989 TCR.  EPA anticipates greater public   health protection under the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requirements.  The RTCR:

  • Requires public water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems; and
  • Establishes criteria for systems to qualify for and stay on reduced monitoring, which could reduce water system burden and provide incentives for better system operation.
  • Click here for more information about the RTCR.

Assessment and Corrective Action required under RTCR

Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.  Lets talk about Assessment and Corrective action.

Under the RTCR, there is no longer a monthly maximum contaminant level (MCL) violation for multiple total coliform detections.  New revisions require systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system to assess the problem and take corrective action that may reduce cases of illnesses and deaths due to potential fecal contamination and waterborne pathogen exposure.   The rule says “The Distribution System”  of course, what that means is,  “The Water Utility Manager or Operator” is now required to assess the problem and take corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.

Getting started assessing the problem:

A tank inspection may be the best place to start with the assessment.  Is the vent screen in place?  Are there birds or insects in the tank?  There are at least 12 steps to a water tank inspection and at least one of them should be to get a look inside the facility to see if there is sediment on the floor of the tank.  Over time, sediment will build up on the floor area of almost all water storage tanks and towers.  One to three inches is not uncommon here in Texas. Sediment is known to be a habitat for bacteria, protozoa and viruses.  Inspection contractors can offer great documentation of the interior condition of water storage tanks with no disruption in water utility service.  Using remotely operated cameras, inspection robots, or even potable water divers, high tech contractors can deliver great information about the water storage tank or tower.  For information on in-service Water Tank and Tower Inspections, see our inspection page at www.ronperrin.com. For tips on doing your own potable water tank or tower inspection, see: Do your own potable Water Tank Inspection at:  THE TANK DIVER blog.

Corrective action may be as simple as basic housekeeping.  If you know the facility has never been cleaned there is more than a good chance sediment inside the structure needs to be removed.  Again, a qualified diving contractor can save time, water and money by removing all loose sediment with minimal water loss or disruption in service.  For more information on using a Potable Water Dive Crew to clean your potable water tank or tower see our cleaning page: www.ronperrin.com/cleaning

Our tank cleaning customers tell us time and again that their chlorine use was significantly reduced after we cleaned their facility.   With regular inspections and cleanings your likelihood of a coliform contamination are greatly reduced,  if not completely eliminated.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Sediment sample

Sediment samples

To request a tank inspection or cleaning quote, call Ron Perrin Water Technologies toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

Deadly amoeba found in a U.S. drinking water system

August 2013, the death of a 4-year-old boy staying near Violet, Louisiana, was linked to the naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a slip and slide connected to the St. Bernard Parish’s water system that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba.

More common in Australia NBC news reported that this was the first case in the U.S.

For more see: “Four year old’s Death linked to Rare Amoeba in Water System”

Keeping the city’s potable water storage tanks and towers clean may be more important now than ever!

Over time almost all tanks accumulate sediment on the floor. Any amount of sediment can become a habitat for bacteria, protozoa (like Cryptosporidium) and viruses. However, when tests show chlorine depletion, the idea of removing the sediment is usually not thought of. Additional treatment chemicals are usually the first line of defense, quickly becoming chemical warfare and potentially leaving the tank with low, or no, chlorine protection for long periods. American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that potable water storage tanks be cleaned every 3 to five years. Few states actually require tanks to be cleaned on a regular basis, and some don’t require it at all.

When a contaminant (bacteria, protozoa or viruses) enters a water storage tank and finds sediment to get a foothold in, chlorine can be quickly depleted while the contaminants grow under the protection of the sediment. Even otherwise harmless bacteria can help to deplete chlorine reserves leaving the tank vulnerable to more dangerous contaminants.

Removing sediment from the floor of potable water storage tanks greatly reduces the chance that any contaminant can get a foothold in the distribution system and grow to become a larger problem.

So why isn’t cleaning potable water storage tanks a common practice? Removing tanks from service to perform cleaning is time consuming and expensive. The smaller the water utility, the more difficult it is to find the budget for preventive maintenance.  There are many contractors that offer Potable Water Dive crews that can remove floor sediment with little or no down time and minimal water loss. Using a qualified potable water dive crew to clean water storage tanks can save the water utility time and water.

Keeping potable water storage tanks free of accumulated sediment is essential for the health of the system and the health of your customers. If you administer a drinking water system, make a plan to schedule cleanings and stick to it.

References:

For more information on Potable Water Divers see:  www.ronperrin.com

For more information on Naegleria fowleri amoeba in drinking water see:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/public-water-systems.html

NOTE: You cannot be infected with Naegleria fowleri by drinking contaminated water. In very rare instances, Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or contaminated tap water) enters the nose. (For example: when people submerge their heads or cleanse their noses during religious practices, and when people irrigate their sinuses (nose) using contaminated tap water.)

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 

Cryptosporidium Drinking Water Health Advisory  EPA  March 2001

DEEP TREKKER ROV – First Test Run June 2013

UPDATE JULY 1, 2020.

In 2013 We Purchased a DEEP TREKKER ROV to use inspecting potable water storage tanks and towers.  I am happy to report it is still working and doing a great job in 2020.
This video shows our first “Test Flight” in a clear-well and the second inspection we did on a ground storage tank. We added a safety rope to protect the tether and found the lighting system caused a little bit of glare when we went into darker parts of the tank, but it was reduced when we got closer to the inspection points we needed to look at. Overall, we found it to be a very good inspection tool!

To learn more about what may be in potable water tanks and towers visit:

“THE CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT”

For more information on RON PERRIN WATER TECHNOLOGIES click here or visit www.ronperrin.com

Do you need a Potable water tank or tower inspected?

Our inspection methods offer the most information for the least cost,  all of our inspection methods include an underwater DVD allowing you to see what is in your storage tanks.  Remote video camera, ROV or potable water diver we have a method for every budget.

Call us toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

Underwater Services offered to U.S. Water Systems

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in potable water tank & tower inspection. We offer 3 different water tank & tower inspections. All of these inspections provide digital photos of inspection points and problem areas along with an underwater DVD so you can see the interior roof and floor of your water storage tank with no water loss or disruption in service. We take pride in offering you the most information for the least cost. 

Our potable water dive team is available to clean sediment from the floor of your water storage tanks, set plugs, and offer other underwater services.

Field Tech Inspecting a water tower

Field Tech Inspecting a water tower

Other than underwater inspections with a remote camera, cleaning of potable water storage tanks is our most popular Underwater Service.Diver enters water tower.

Water Storage Tank Cleaning VideoSince 1997, we have worked for over 500 water utilities in over 8 U.S. states and Internationally in Mexico.

To date our International underwater services has only been to inspect fire protection systems for American corporations with plants in Mexico.We are looking forward to offering more international diving services in the future.-Visit our web page at www.ronperrin.com

Inspection Contractor for 30 years!

I have been a Water Tank Inspection Contractor for over 30 years. Starting in 1991, my first inspections were done on my days off while still working as a full-time Texas Peace Officer. I was a principal at Tank Diver Inspections (TDI) a startup company that failed. Form 1994 to 96 I was director of marketing at U.S. Underwater Services in 96 I was promoted to Director of Operations. In 1997 I established Ron Perrin Water Technologies and devoted myself to developing the best methods to inspect and clean potable water storage tanks with NO DISRUPTION in water service. We incorporated in 2020. We offer the best inspection in the industry. We are here to serve you! We offer three different water storage tanks inspections, all include underwater documentation with our underwater video cameras and lighting systems.


Our Company
 provides nondisruptive water tank inspections on potable water storage tanks in Texas and 14 other states. In Texas, our tank inspections meet all requirements found under Texas Administrative code 290.46 (m)(1) -Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.  We want to be your Contracted Inspection Service.

In Texas you must examine your ground, elevated, and pressure storage tanks at least once every year to make sure they are in good working condition. Tanks should be inspected no later than one year after the last time you checked them.

Ground and elevated tanks are required to be inspected inside and out every year. Pressure tanks also need to be inspected on the outside every year and if they have an inspection port they are required to have the interior inspected once every five years. The grounds and facilities shall be maintained in a manner so as to minimize the possibility of the harboring of rodents, insects, and other disease vectors, and in such a way as to prevent other conditions that might cause the contamination of the water.  (1) Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.    (A) Ground and elevated storage tank inspections must determine that the vents are in place and properly screened, the roof hatches closed and locked, flap valves and gaskets provide adequate protection against insects, rodents, and other vermin, the interior and exterior coating systems are continuing to provide adequate protection to all metal surfaces, and the tank remains in a watertight condition.  

It is extremely important these facilities be properly inspected, we recently inspected a ground storage tank that had a damaged vent screen, inside on the floor of the tank we found two dead rats. Not what you want in a water tank that you are drinking out of. Birds and insects are much more common, it there is a hole in the vent screen that you can put your finger in you can bet there are insects in the tank. It the hole is big enough to put your fist in there is a good chance you will find a dead bird. On a hot day, the animals can smell the water if there is a way for them to get it they will. Like a big lobster trap they can get in but they can’t get out. Let’s take a look at your tanks!

We have several inspections to choose from:

  • Remote Underwater Video – This is is our most popular and economical inspection. We document all State required inspection points. Our report is delivered in a notebook with photographs of inspection points and an underwater video that covers the interior roof, water surface, waterline and underwater areas visible from our remote underwater camera and lighting system.
  • Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV)- Covers everything above with additional underwater video taken from one of our ROV’s. This allows you to get a more detailed inspection for much larger facilities. It also allows a customer to get great documentation on specific areas if needed.
  • Diver Inspection– Our potable water dive crew is usually reserved to clean water storage tanks and towers. The divers are sealed in their own environment using a DRY SUIT. No part of the divers body touches the water in addition, to meet state and federal requirements divers are washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution. Divers are able to get an even more detailed inspection.
  • Tank Cleaning and Inspection– All of our inspections include an underwater video of tank floors. This allows us to get a good estimate of accumulated sediment. It is important to know how much sediment is in the tank. Sediment on the floor of the tank that can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses. Our cleaning service removes all loose sediment. After the sediment is removed we are able to see the floor of the tank allowing us to document the condition of the paint and see corroded areas if any. When is the last time your tanks were cleaned?

If you are task with inspecting your own tank we can help with that too. I teach a course at the Environmental Training Institute (ETI) located at the UT Arlington Division for Enterprise Development. The class is 16 hours over two days and has class dates scheduled in 2021 and 2022.

WTR 308 Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques

Course NameMeetsBeginsEndsFee
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesW&Th 8:30 A–5:30 P09/29/2109/30/21650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh&F 8:30 AM–5:30 P08/18/2208/19/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques (Online)Th& F 8:30 A–5:30 P04/14/2204/15/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh& F 8:30 A–5:30 P12/08/2212/09/22650.00

If you cant make the class I also offer a review of what you need to look at online see:

www.watertankinspecton.co – A DIY Guide to Inspecting Potable Water Storage Tanks.

Last in Texas you will need to maintain a Water Tank Inspection Log

PWS Water Tank Inspection Log – Texas.gov

If we may be of service please contact us.

For a free quote for inspection or cleaning e-mail Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com or call 817-377-4899.

For more info see; www.ronperrin.com or or blog www.tankdiver.us.

E. coli has been found in many drinking water systems, but what is it?

Escherichia coli, commonly referred to as E. coli, is in a group of organisms known as coliforms: 
common bacteria found in the digestive system of humans and animals.

There are only a few strains that cause serious disease in humans. One of these strains is responsible for causing Traveler’s diarrhea, and the second is E. coli O157:H7, which contaminates meat and leafy vegetables. 

Under a high magnification of 6836X, this digitally-colorized, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image depicted a growing cluster of Gram-negative, rod-shaped, Escherichia coli bacteria, of the strain O157:H7, which is a pathogenic strain of E. coli.
Source: CDC/ National Escherichia, Shigella, Vibrio Reference Unit at CDC – Photo Credit; Janice Haney Carr 2006.

The “O157:H7” strain has caused serious hemorrhagic diarrhea and for some, long term complications resulting in illness and even death in some cases.


The presence of E. coli is used as an indicator to monitor the possible presence of other more harmful microbes, such as Giardia, Shigella, Norovirus and the Protozoa Cryptosporidium. Diseases resulting from contact with water contaminated by E. coli can cause gastrointestinal illness, skin, ear, respiratory, eye, neurologic, and wound infections. The most commonly reported symptoms are diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, and low-grade fever. When E. coli exceeds the permissible level in recreational water, it results in the closing of public swimming pools and fishing areas.

Some possible sources of fecal contamination include: wildlife, agricultural runoff or runoff from areas contaminated with livestock manure, wastewater treatment plants, or private septic systems. Heavy rain may cause organisms to be washed into waterways, lakes or ground water. If contaminated water is then used as a source of drinking water and is not treated, or is inadequately treated, it may result in illness.

When this contaminant makes its way into a drinking water system sediment found on the bottom of water storage tanks can provide a safe habitat. E. coli along with other bacteria and pathogens, can find shelter from disinfectants under the the soft sediment that accumulates in storage tanks..

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list E. coli as one of the top 10 Causes of outbreaks in public water systems.

The best way to insure that E. coli or other bacteria will not invade your tank sediment is to remove it. Clean your water storage tanks then maintain them by getting them on a cleaning schedule.

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks and towers. Our inspection methods cover all state required inspection points. We also include a video produced by a underwater camera and lighting system that are able to properly inspect the interior floors of your facilities to determine sediment levels. We do all of this with no disruption in service and no water loss.

Our potable water dive team can keep your tanks clean with no disruption in service and minimal water loss. When sediment is removed the habitat that allows bacteria and other contaminants to remain in your tank is also gone. This allows the disinfectants like chlorine to do a much more effective job. Our customers report to us that they use less chlorine, after their tanks are cleaned to meet standards. For more information go to: www.ronperrin.com, send an e-mail to perrinsales@gmail.com or call 817-377-4899 for a quote today.

Reference: CDC Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Public Water Systems – . Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems

E. coli – CDC –Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. E. coli are a large and diverse group of bacteria. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick. Some kinds of E. coli can cause diarrhea, while others cause urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses.

See more here: https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/index.html

In 2020 Texas officials Found Brain-Eating microbe in water supply

Sep 26, 2020 Texas residents warned of tap water tainted with brain-eating microbe. Texas officials have warned residents of some communities near Houston to stop using tap water because it might be tainted with a deadly brain-eating microbe.

The Guardian Reported:

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) warned the Brazosport Water Authority late on Friday of the potential contamination of its water supply by Naegleria fowleri.

The commission issued an advisory warning people not to use tap water for any reason except to flush toilets in Lake Jackson, Freeport, Angleton, Brazoria, Richwood, Oyster Creek, Clute and Rosenberg.

Those communities are home to about 120,000 people. Also affected are the Dow Chemical works in Freeport, which has 4,200 employees, and the Clemens and Wayne Scott state prison units, which have 2,345 inmates and 655 employees.

PFAS have been detected in the drinking water of more than 1,400 communities in 49 states, according to research.

The advisory will remain in place until the Brazosport authority’s water system has been thoroughly flushed and tests on water samples show the system’s water is safe to use. It said in a statement that it was unclear how long it would be before the tap water was safe.

See the full story here:


With everything going on last year I missed this story. My take on this story is one of the reasons I got into diving water tanks in the first place. To explain why this story made me think about how I came to build a company that puts divers into water storage tanks I need to tell you something about myself and even about my parents.

In the early 1990s I was working as a Texas police officer, and my passion was SCUBA Diving. My love of SCUBA Diving goes back even farther. My dad was Charles B. Perrin, he passed in 2016 at the age of 78. He claims to have purchased the first Aqua-Lung in Fort Worth in the mid 1950’s. He had to order it from a welding supply long before the first SCUBA store opened in Texas. Both my mom and dad spent time water-skiing and SCUBA diving on Possum Kingdom Lake (PK) west of Fort Worth on the Brazos River. They were both civil servants: my dad worked for the IRS and my Mom was an Executive for the Corps of Engineers. Raising their family in the 60’s-80″s this solid middle class income gave them enough extra money to not only afford to give us a great middle class lifestyle, it also allowed them to purchase a second home, something that seems out of reach for most of us today.

They purchased a lake house on Possum Kingdom Lake (PK) where I spent most of the weekends of my youth. Even before they purchased the first lake property my dad had taken me out to PK in a small fishing boat with his one set of Scuba Gear and instructed me how to SCUBA dive. In 1971, I was 12 years old. The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) was not even founded until 1966. My dad predated standard training practices that would come along after his diving years were done. With no formal courses available my parents taught themselves how to dive with the help of “The Skin Diver” (later renamed Skin Diver Magazine). Sea Hunt starring Lloyd Bridges*, was also a favorite TV program in our home. I personally would not get formally trained and certified until the early 1980’s.

I can still remember my first dive. I was so excited. It was a clear summer day and our 14′ “Little Dude” fiberglass fishing boat was anchored in a remote area over crystal clear water about 10′ deep. I put dad’s tank, mask and fins on just like Lloyd Bridges. I checked the regulator which gave me that great scuba diving sound as cold compressed air shot into my mouth from the 72 cubic inch steel tank strapped to my back. I sat on the side of the boat and dad explained to me how to make entry by going over backwards.

“Hold on to your mask,” he said as he pushed me over the side. The water was cold on my hot sun soaked skin, my heart rate shot up and I was breathing was as rapid as I could breath! I was sure I was going to die as I tried to get my head above water. Turning myself around underwater I shot back to the surface with all my strength but I was stopped by my dad putting his hand on my head and holding me underwater until my breathing finally slowed down and my initial panic subsided. My dad was the worst SCUBA instructor ever! Despite that first dive experience that could best be described as violent or even brutal, I fell in love with diving. By the time I was 14 I was exploring the lake on my own spearfishing in the many coves and inlets. I never had a buddy to dive with but I always had a sharp knife in case I got tanged in an abandoned trout line that seemed to be everywhere I wanted to dive.

Growing up on the lake the brain-eating ameba Naegleria fowleri is something I have been aware of most of my life at least as far back as I can remember. Diving and Water Skiing were my favorite things to do on the lake. In late summer the river flow would slow down. The water going through the dam would be reduced and water become more stagnant. At the same time the hot summer sun warms the water. Naegleria fowleri  loves warm water and in late summer Texas lake water gets very warm. I remember news stories from water skiers (usually teenaged children) getting the organism in their nose and dying from it, going back to my teenage years. When the lake level went down too low we stopped diving and water skiing.

When cooler weather arrives in mid September, Naegleria fowleri lies dormant in the sediment at the bottom of lakes and riverbeds, which is why experts advise that you not stir up any more of that sludge/sediment than necessary. First discovered in 1899, Naegleria fowleri is a protist pathogen, known to infect the central nervous system and produce primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

In 1991 I discovered that the American Water Works Association had a standard to put scuba divers into drinking water. Using a drysuit and a full face mask, a diver could be totally isolated from the water supply. To meet the standard that has been adopted by the USEPA and TCEQ the diver must also be washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution. Taking the tank out of service and then decontaminating the entire facility with very expensive and time consuming super chlorination procedure. Decontamination of the diver is much more economical. In addition other advantages are the diver can move around all underwater areas. Equipped with a good underwater lighting and camera system the diver can document the condition of the facility and deliver a great inspection report with no water loss or disruption in service. After I mastered diving in potable water I saw a common problem potable water tanks have – over time, sediment collects on the floor of tanks.

I read everything I could about tank sediment. In 1990 the National Drinking Water Advisory Council stated that drinking water contamination from bacteria, protozoa and viruses may be the biggest challenge for drinking water professionals in the future. The future is here, over time almost all tanks collect sediment. Tank sediment can be a safe habitat for a wide host of microbes including crypto and Naegleria fowleri.

When I ask about sediment removal I was told the standard method was a bucket and a shovel. We immediately started working on a better way. First using some methods developed for moving sand to look for treasure off-shore a much simpler method was developed by 1999. We now use a 3″ trash pump to clean most ground storage tanks and with water towers we simply use gravity to create all the suction we need to quickly remove sediment from the floor of the tank. Cleaning water storage tanks is not as common as you may think. Our company inspects over seven hundred tanks a year. Every week we find tanks that have never been cleaned. Currently there are no USEPA rules on when tanks should be cleaned. Texas has administrative rules under 290.46 requiring all potable water storage to be inspected annually. However, Texas along with most other states, have no rules on how often water storage tanks should be cleaned. The interior of water tanks often remain, “Out-of-sight and out-of-mind”.

Photo: Potable Water Diver wearing a dry suit and Kirby Morgan B-17 Diving Helmet

KEEPING WATER STORAGE TANKS CLEAN IS IMPORTANT

This story is about communities on the lower part of the Brazos River that have had Naegleria fowleri turn up in their drinking water system. The standard remediation for this is often to perform a chlorine burn that increases the chlorine to a high level. This kills all contaminants it comes into contact with. So everything on the surface in the water system that is underwater, including all tanks and water mains is sanitized. But what about the contaminants that remain hidden under a layer of sediment in the water storage tank? Administrators often are unaware of any tank sediment that may still be lurking in water storage tanks again, Out-of-sight and out-of- mind. The chlorine burn will kill all contaminants on the surface of the sediment. This is why proper tank inspections that can determine the actual sediment levels are so important. One half to three inches of sediment is very common. Without removing the sediment, contaminants remain in the tank and will continue to be a problem in the future. All water storage tanks should be on a cleaning schedule. Some tanks may need to be cleaned annually while others may be able to be on a three or five year program.

Photo Above: Remotely controlled Cleaning Robot being deployed on a 158′ standpipe water storage tank

First established in 1997, Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the underwater inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks and towers. We offer three different inspection methods: 1) remote camera, 2) Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and 3) Potable Water Diver. Our divers are commercially trained from great schools like The Ocean Corporation where I serve on the Educational Advisory Board. We offer diver cleaning with no disruption in service and minimal water loss on ground and elevated tanks. For standpipes over 70 feet tall we have a Robot Cleaning Service.

See more about what we do and how we do it at our website at: www.ronperrin.com.

Also check out our new video series: www.TapTalk.blog.


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*Sea Hunt is an American action adventure television series that aired in syndication from 1958 to 1961 and was popular for decades afterwards. Click Hear to watch Sea Hunt

Other References:

Naegleria fowleri is responsible for the death of a 6-year-old boy in Lake Jackson, Texas, and environmental officials say the city will be fighting the pathogen for months TPO ARTICLE HERE.

Texas Monthly – “The Risk Of Exposure To Brain-Eating Amoeba Spikes In The Summer Months”

Do you need to inspect your own water storage tank? See our DIY Guide to Inspecting Potable Water Storage Tanks. HERE: www.watertankinspection.co

Water Tank Inspector Wanted

WATER TANK INSPECTOR WANTED

We are seeking experienced Water Utility Worker to perform tank inspections and general water tank maintenance procedures. No criminal history and good driving record are required.  Confined space and fall protection training is required before employment and may be done online.  Underwater camera and ROV training will also be provided.

Preference is given to persons who have climbing experience. You must be in good physical condition and able to climb 150ft straight ladders on water towers. We are only taking applications from persons who currently live in the north-central Texas area (in or near the DFW metro area). We have a full-time opening working out of our Main Office in Ft Worth, Tx. This position requires frequent out-of-town travel (2-5 days a week, often work on a 4 day work week with 3 days off). A valid Driver’s license and a good driving record are required. For additional information and application see our blog at www.taptalk.blog

Requirements.

  • Must be able to work at heights, we inspect and clean water storage towers.
  • Must be 18 years of age or older
  • Must have high school diploma or equivalent
  • Must have a valid driver license
  • Must be able to pass a pre-employment background check
  • Must be able to pass a pre-employment drug screen, heavy drinkers need not apply*.
  • Must be legally authorized to work in the United States
  • Must live in, or relocate to, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.
  • Our office is 100% Vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus.  Due to the fact that COVID-19 Vaccines are Widely Available, applicants must be vaccinated before scheduling an in person interview*.  

Preferred Qualifications.

  • Confined Space Training
  • Fall Protection Training
  • OSHA – 10 Hour or 30 Hour Construction Course certificate
  • O2 Provider certification
  • NDT certification(s)
  • Rigging

This is a general job description. In some cases, it may not describe all tasks that may be assigned. We maintain a drug-free workplace. The position requires the successful completion of drug screening and background checks before going on some Federal Contracts, failure to pass these checks may result in dismissal before or after completion of a probationary period.

Diversity Statement (EEO)
Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. Qualified applicants receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, national origin or ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, religion, age, disability, gender identity, genetic information, service in the military, or any other status protected by law.

We are looking for persons currently living in or near north-central Texas (in or near DFW). For an interview Call 817-377-4899 (voice only).

Job Types: Full-time, Part-time out of town travel is required.

Pay: $120.00 – $160.00 per day

*If you feel the need to drink alcohol every day this may not be where you want to work. We prefer to hire individuals who can work several days a week “on the road” without drinking alcohol and of course without any illegal drug use. While their is nothing wrong with having a few beers after work, occasionally people may have too much to drink too late at night. When climbing on water towers we need our employees to be 100% alert and not hung over. Alcohol use also tends to dehydrate people, this can be a safety concern when climbing on a hot and often very hot water tank or tower. We are serious about safety.

*COVID-19 considerations:
We perform weekly COVID 19 tests on employees. Currently, our staff is 100% vaccinated. We are seeking someone who has or is willing to get a COVID-19 vaccination.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

The Water Tower and Outer Space Connection with Neil deGrasse Tyson

It turns out that Neil deGrasse Tyson @neilty is a fan of Water Towers.

In this short video Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how water towers work and their connection to outer space. Neil has spent his life in the study of astronomy, and while it is true SPACE is the final frontier, the inner space of a municipal water tank is where the battle for the universe is actually being fought. Every day my divers work in a space with no oxygen. We remove microscopic bacteria and a wide range of other contaminants threatening the health of our drinking water here on earth.

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow GiardiaLegionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tower cleaning rates start at only $2,450.00. Affordable protection for your water storage tanks affordable safety for the people you serve.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers.

We serve municipal water utilities, federal parks and prisons and private industry. We deploy underwater cameras or remotely operated vehicles to perform inspections of drinking water tanks.

Our methods save our customers millions of gallons of treated drinking water every year.  If the facility needs to be cleaned our potable water dive team can remove tank sediment with minimal water loss and little to no disruption in service. For more information visit: www.watertankinspection.com

To get a cleaning proposal please call 817-377-4899 or contact Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com.