Assessment and Corrective Action required under RTCR

Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.  Lets talk about Assessment and Corrective action.

Under the RTCR, there is no longer a monthly maximum contaminant level (MCL) violation for multiple total coliform detections.  New revisions require systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system to assess the problem and take corrective action that may reduce cases of illnesses and deaths due to potential fecal contamination and waterborne pathogen exposure.   The rule says “The Distribution System”  of course, what that means is,  “The Water Utility Manager or Operator” is now required to assess the problem and take corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.

Getting started assessing the problem:

A tank inspection may be the best place to start with the assessment.  Is the vent screen in place?  Are there birds or insects in the tank?  There are at least 12 steps to a water tank inspection and at least one of them should be to get a look inside the facility to see if there is sediment on the floor of the tank.  Over time, sediment will build up on the floor area of almost all water storage tanks and towers.  One to three inches is not uncommon here in Texas. Sediment is known to be a habitat for bacteria, protozoa and viruses.  Inspection contractors can offer great documentation of the interior condition of water storage tanks with no disruption in water utility service.  Using remotely operated cameras, inspection robots, or even potable water divers, high tech contractors can deliver great information about the water storage tank or tower.  For information on in-service Water Tank and Tower Inspections, see our inspection page at www.ronperrin.com. For tips on doing your own potable water tank or tower inspection, see: Do your own potable Water Tank Inspection at:  THE TANK DIVER blog.

Corrective action may be as simple as basic housekeeping.  If you know the facility has never been cleaned there is more than a good chance sediment inside the structure needs to be removed.  Again, a qualified diving contractor can save time, water and money by removing all loose sediment with minimal water loss or disruption in service.  For more information on using a Potable Water Dive Crew to clean your potable water tank or tower see our cleaning page: www.ronperrin.com/cleaning

Our tank cleaning customers tell us time and again that their chlorine use was significantly reduced after we cleaned their facility.   With regular inspections and cleanings your likelihood of a coliform contamination are greatly reduced,  if not completely eliminated.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Sediment sample

Sediment samples

To request a tank inspection or cleaning quote, call Ron Perrin Water Technologies toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

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