Have you cleaned your water storage tanks lately?

Multiple USEPA White papers have documented that bacteria, protozoa and even viruses can use the sediment that accumulates on the floor of water storage tanks as a habitat to grow and become a problem in water systems. One of these papers was published on June17, 2002. Titled

Health Risks From Microbial Growth and Biofilms in Drinking Water Distribution Systems”

Many studies have identified microbes in accumulated sediments, including both pathogens and non-pathogens. These include bacteria, viruses, protozoa, algae, fungi and invertebrates. Opportunistic pathogens that have been detected, and can multiply in sediments, include Legionella and mycobacteria (van der Kooij, 2000). Some primary pathogens can also survive for some time in sediments. Hepatitis A virus survived more than four months in sediments at both 5/C and 25/C (Sobsey et al., 1986). Other opportunistic pathogens found in sediments include Pseudomonas fluorescens and Flavobacterium spp. (Berger et al., 1993). Sediments can also release nutrients into the water which stimulate biofilm growth downstream (LeChevallier, 1999b).

The paper explains there is steady inflow of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, nematodes, and other microorganisms enter the distribution system.

We often find that some of the deepest sediment is found in the smaller storage tanks. Our cleaning service is priced right. We clean tanks from 3,000 to 30 million gallons. Give us a call at 817-377-4899 and we will give you a proposal designed for your specific tank.

Have you cleaned your water storage tanks lately?

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