Water Tower Cleaning

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Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers.

Water Tower cleaning.

Sediment removal from water tower.

We serve municipal water utilities, federal parks and prisons and private industry. We deploy underwater cameras or remotely operated vehicles to perform inspections of drinking water tanks.

Our methods save our customers millions of gallons of treated drinking water every year.  If the facility needs to be cleaned our potable water dive team can remove tank sediment with minimal water loss and little to no disruption in service.

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow Giardia, Legionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tower cleaning rates start at only $2,450.00. Affordable protection for your water storage tanks affordable safety for the people you serve.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

We are here when you need us!

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Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry.  We use remotely operated underwater video cameras to get the most information for the lowest possible cost. We are able to inspect your tanks inside and out with no water loss or disruption in service.

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If your water tank or tower needs to be cleaned our potable water dive crew can remove all loose sediment from the floor of the facility with minimal water loss. Give us a call at 817-377-4899 for a free quote. Check out and like our Facebook page facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

 

EARTH DAY 2020

Today is Earth Day.  Every year on April 22, trees are planted, litter is cleaned up, and awareness for the issues plaguing the planet are raised, in honor of the holiday, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2020.  The first Earth Day was on April 22, 1970. Environmentalists took to the streets with concerned citizens and pop culture icons, like poet Allen Ginsberg, who were asked to speak on behalf of Mother Earth.

The 1970s saw the passage of the most comprehensive environmental legislation in U.S. history, including the Clean Air Act, the Water Quality Improvement Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act, and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. In addition, just eight months after the first Earth Day, Richard Nixon approved the creation of a new organization tasked with monitoring the nation’s natural assets: the Environmental Protection Agency. You can find more facts about earth day at DO Something . ORG.

 I manage a company that spends every day inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers.  Our goal is to save treated drinking water by performing required inspections without draining storage tanks.  We use underwater cameras that allow us to enter the water system, inspect the tank, and produce a comprehensive report on its condition without disrupting water service.  Over the years our “no water loss” inspections have saved tens of millions of gallons of treated drinking water.

Earth Day makes me think about what could be and how we could do more. In 2019 we inspected 651 potable water storage tanks and towers, but we only cleaned 105 of them. and that is a very typical year.  Even on one of our best years in 2017 we inspected 863 facilities but only cleaned 95.   There were hundreds more that needed to be cleaned but the decision was made not to clean the tank.

To understand why we only clean a fraction of the tanks that need to be cleaned and why that is a big deal, I need to give you a brief explanation of how water systems work.  Your drinking water comes from ground water (aquifers), or from rivers and lakes (surface water).  The most common disinfectant used is chlorine if it is from surface water it is also processed through different media at a water treatment plant.  After the water has been processed it is pumped into a storage facility like a ground storage tank tank (GST), or an elevated storage tank (EST), where it sits and waits until you use it at your tap (60 Second Video Click here).

A few states have rules that require water storage facilities to be inspected every year but very few require tanks to be cleaned. Texas Administrative Code 290.46 (M)(1) requires all potable water tanks to be inspected inside and out annually.  I guess it was assumed that when the inspection showed the interior floor was covered with sediment the utility would take action to keep it clean.  That is not what is happening.  Water regulations that keep us safe are much too complex for this article. The short answer is, as long as water testing is negative for coliform the water is deemed to be safe.  Coliform is what is looked for to determine if microbes can live in the water.  When it is not found the water is deemed safe to drink.  About 7 years ago new rules under the  Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) required some additional monitoring of total coliform’s and E. coli.

There are now also requirements for assessments and corrective action when monitoring results show that public water systems (PWS) may be vulnerable to contamination.

In this case if no other breach can be found a good look at the water storage tank would meet the requirements for an additional assessment.  If the results of the inspection showed that sediment was covering the floor of the tank, cleaning the tank could be the corrective action needed. Unfortunately, the complexity of the Revised Total Coliform Rule does not result in most tanks not being cleaned.  In Texas, tank inspections are required but tank cleaning is often put off due to budget constraints or because those responsible don’t understand the dangers that can lurk in sediment.

The problem is as simple as a game of Hide & Seek.  When conducting the required water testing a sample of water is taken from a tap on, or near, the water tank.  Coliform must be found in the water to know there is a problem.  Only a few feet away sediment on the floor of the tank may be hiding the contamination.  A host of undetected microbes including bacteria, protozoa and even viruses, can use the tank sediment to get a foothold in the tank. Often left undisturbed for years, these contaminants continue to grow until they overpower the disinfectant in the tank.  They can then be detected through required water monitoring but the damage is already done.  The water system is compromised when testing finds too much Coliform in the system. Then boiled water notices are sent out to protect public health.

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Sediment covering the floor of water storage tanks is a breach.  It is as bad as a hole in the roof.  Sediment can let almost any microbe or parasite that may have just passed through get a foothold in the water system, grow and become a public health problem.

Tank inspections are required in some states. However, even in those states tank cleanings still require a sales pitch unless the water system is compromised and testing finds too much Coliform in the system.  That is often when we get the call.

Many well managed and well funded water utilities keep their water tanks and towers cleaned.  This is why I came up with the tag line “Your zip code should not determine your water quality”.  The fact is, like many other things in life, where you live affects almost everything, but it should not affect your water quality in the United States. Smaller systems that are not well-funded just need additional information about why keeping water tanks clean makes such a big difference.  When tanks are clean the cost of disinfectants like chlorine goes down. The system is healthier and less likely to get a RTCR violation.  In this case doing the right thing actually saves money and makes maintaining regulations easier.

This small, overlooked part of the world affects millions of people.  Keeping tanks clean is just basic housekeeping and should be the standard at every public water utility.  Unfortunately, it is not the first thing thought of when violations occur.  The knee-jerk reaction is to add more disinfectants. However, when the maximum residual is reached, the decision is often made to change disinfectants.  This just adds up to more time and money wasted if the tanks have not been properly inspected or kept clean.  

Thanks for staying with me this far.  This is where I decided to DO SOMETHING.

The Ron Perrin Clean Water Tank Project Inc. was established to educate water utility managers about the importance of keeping tanks clean.  Help me get water utility managers to think about cleaning storage tanks FIRST instead of Last or not at all! We are producing a documentary, promoting our blog and creating literature on the importance of keeping tanks clean. Our non-profit is registered and can be supported through the SMILE program at AmazonSmile.  Search for the “Ron Perrin Clean Water Tank Project Inc.” and you can round up the change on your Amazon Purchase to allow us to get the change and help us DO SOMETHING that needs doing.  Together we can make a change by improving water quality for more people.

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Do you still need a reason to clean your water storage tanks

Sediment on the floor of your water storage tank is a Breach in your system. The more sediment you have in your water storage tanks the bigger your risk for having a water-related contaminant issue. Tank sediment builds up over time and can provide a wide range of contaminants including viruses a way to get a foothold in your water system. The tank sediment can provide a safe habitat allowing a small number of bacteria or viruses to quickly grow into the billions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released a guidance and fact sheet on transmission of the novel coronavirus in water.

THE GOOD: The agency stated: “Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.”

THE BAD: The fact is other viruses are found in drinking water, in fact you will find them in the top ten contaminants. Including Hepatitis A, a vaccine-preventable, communicable disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), and Norovirus. A very contagious virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea. Conventional water treatment methods should also prevent these viruses from contaminating drinking water systems but they remain in the top ten of drinking water-related contaminants.

Here is the top ten list of Water-related Diseases and Contaminants the CDC found in in Public Water Systems.

The United States has one of the safest public drinking water supplies in the world. Over 286 million Americans get their tap water from a community water system (1). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates drinking water quality in public water systems and sets maximum concentration levels for water chemicals and pollutants.

Sources of drinking water are subject to contamination and require appropriate treatment to remove disease-causing contaminants. Contamination of drinking water supplies can occur in the source water as well as in the distribution system after water treatment has already occurred. There are many sources of water contamination, including naturally occurring chemicals and minerals (for example, arsenic, radon, uranium), local land use practices (fertilizers, pesticides, concentrated feeding operations), manufacturing processes, and sewer overflows or wastewater releases.

The presence of contaminants in water can lead to adverse health effects, including gastrointestinal illness, reproductive problems, and neurological disorders. Infants, young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people whose immune systems are compromised because of AIDS, chemotherapy, or transplant medications, may be especially susceptible to illness from some contaminants.

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*
Giardia
Legionella
Norovirus
Shigella
Campylobacter
Copper
Salmonella
Hepatitis A
Cryptosporidium
E. coli, excess fluoride (tie)

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Source: CDC https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html

Why Isn’t ChlorineTreatment Enough?

I had some water utility workers ask me, “Why isn’t chlorine treatment of potable water enough to keep water safe? Why should we worry about cleaning tanks when we already use chlorine?”

Chlorine works great as long as there is not a breach in the tank. When there is a breach like a hole in the top that lets birds and insects inside the tank, the chlorine can not keep up. This is why annual tank inspections are so important. People have died from this scenario, see: “Salmonella Outbreak in Alamosa, Colorado“. According to USEPA officials a sediment build up on the interior floor of a water storage tank is another type of breach. Bacteria like Legionella, protozoa like Cryptosporidium, and a wide range of viruses including Norovirus can hide and GROW in the tank sediment.

Do you know what the #1 cause of municipal water contamination is? According to the CDC it is a microscopic parasite called Giardia. The sediment becomes a perfect habitat providing both shelter and food for Giardia and many other microorganisms to grow. In time, the contaminants can reach a point where they overwhelm chlorine or any other disinfectant you may be using. Keeping tanks clean keeps your drinking water safe.

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

For a complete listing of water-related surveillance data, see CDC’s Surveillance Reports for Drinking Water-associated Disease & Outbreaks.

A professional potable water Dive Crew can remove tank sediment along with everything that is growing in it with minimal water loss.  The diver is sealed in a DRY suit so there is no human contact with the water supply.  He can then enter the tank and make quick work of removing tank sediment and any contaminant that may be hiding in it.  Give us a call toll free at 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

For more information on Municipal Water Tank Cleaning see: Ron Perrin Water Technologies web Site: www.rpwt.us.

Content source: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Inspecting Water Storage since 1997

As we are getting close to the end of 2019, it seems to be the time of the year when we look back at where we have been.  Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers in Texas and 14 other states.  We have learned a lot over the years and we still strive to deliver the best services at the lowest prices. One of the ways we do that is by limiting our contracting to what we are very good at, and that is inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers.  If you are one of our customers we would like to say THANK YOU!  If you are looking for an inspection contractor give us a call and see why our customers call us back year after year. .

Ron.Perrin.2019

Call toll free: 1-888-481-1768Ron.

 

Fire Suppression Tank Inspection and Cleaning – NFPA 25

NFPA 25 – Fire Suppression Tank Inspection and Cleaning.

NFPA code 25 is the requirement under the National Fire Prevention Association for fire protection tanks to be inspected at least once every five years.

Insurance coverage is often based on compliance of NFPA codes and standards. Our inspections allow you to meet NFPA 25 requirements without draining your water storage tanks or towers.  You never need to lose your fire protection with our inspection service – you are always ready for an effective response in a fire emergency.

We have three tank inspection methods depending on your needs:

Remote underwater video camera

Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV)

Diver inspection and cleaning service

Call our office at 817-377-4899 to get a free quote.