Welcome to our New Diver

Brent Aycock Certified Commercial Diver

Brent Aycock is our newest dive team member. Brent is a Graduate of CDA Technical Institute in Jacksonville, FL. Brent is a former Marine assigned to Amphibious Reconnaissance. He is also a Licensed USCG Boat Captain and graduate of United States Coast Guard Maritime Academy in San Diego CA.

We are very happy to welcome Brent Aycock to our Dive Team!

If you are looking for a career that is more than just another Job please contact us. Our dive roster is currently full but we are planning to run a second dive team in 2022. If you are a qualified diver in the North Texas area let’s get to know each other!  Please send your resume and cover letter to PerrinSales@gmail.com

Diver Employment

Do you live in or near north-central Texas? We are taking an application for a commercial diver to join our potable water dive team. Extra points if you have any experience working for a water utilities. We are also taking applications for a water tank inspection technician. Experience working in the water utilities or regulatory industry is required. Both positions require current physical and the ability to safely climb water storage tanks and towers. Travel is required typically 3-4 days a week. Starting pay is $120 to $160 per day (about $16 to $20 per hour). We work year-round, great entry-level diver position Email Resumes & Dive School Certificate to: perrinsales@gmail.com

For more information and to download an application click here: EMPLOYMENT PAGE

Web site: www.ronperrin.com Video Blog: www.taptalk.blog

Potable WATER Tank HELP WANTED

100_8802

Potable WATER TANK DIVER WANTED

ESTABLISHED WATER TANK AND TOWER INSPECTION AND CLEANING COMPANY is seeking a commercial diver. Good criminal history and driving record is required.

PAID- Out of town travel is required on both positions (typically 3-4 days per week).

Line Air Dive Training is Required. Commercial Diver Experience is preferred.
Fall protection and confined space training are required and may be provided free of charge for the right individual. CURRENT SCUBA, CPR Certification and recent diving physical are required, preference given to ADCI Certified Diver.

We currently have a TANK INSPECTOR Position open.  Must be able to climb water tanks and water towers.  We will train, you will learn how to inspect water tanks with remote video cameras, remotely operated vehicles (ROV). We will also train you on how to clean water tanks with an underwater robot.  Will also be working with dive crew as needed.

Top PAY for experience. E-mail resume with salary history.

Key Responsibilities:
Work underwater and above water with a Dive Team of 3 – 4 commercially certified divers. Efficiently and effectively perform water tank and tower inspections and the removal of tank sediment from the floor of water storage tanks. Must be able to climb 100-200 foot ladders. Must be fit and able to carry gear bags up to 80 pounds.

Working Conditions:

Love of working outdoors is essential and the willingness to work in bad weather conditions. (i.e. rain, high humidity and heat).

Required to work a minimum of 35 hours per week for FT position.
Able to work occasional weekends and overtime as needed.

Employment is year round. Pay based on experience. Pre-employment drug screening is required. This position requires frequent out of town travel, paid by company (from Fort Worth, Texas). Please e-mail resume and use “Resume” on subject line.

Check out what my past employees have to say here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFaumm-X_8k

Also, look at and LIKE our company Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech/

Call 817-377-4899 (voice only) to schedule interview M-F 8 to 5.

Inspection Contractor for 30 years!

I have been a Water Tank Inspection Contractor for over 30 years. Starting in 1991, my first inspections were done on my days off while still working as a full-time Texas Peace Officer. I was a principal at Tank Diver Inspections (TDI) a startup company that failed. Form 1994 to 96 I was director of marketing at U.S. Underwater Services in 96 I was promoted to Director of Operations. In 1997 I established Ron Perrin Water Technologies and devoted myself to developing the best methods to inspect and clean potable water storage tanks with NO DISRUPTION in water service. We incorporated in 2020. We offer the best inspection in the industry. We are here to serve you! We offer three different water storage tanks inspections, all include underwater documentation with our underwater video cameras and lighting systems.


Our Company
 provides nondisruptive water tank inspections on potable water storage tanks in Texas and 14 other states. In Texas, our tank inspections meet all requirements found under Texas Administrative code 290.46 (m)(1) -Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.  We want to be your Contracted Inspection Service.

In Texas you must examine your ground, elevated, and pressure storage tanks at least once every year to make sure they are in good working condition. Tanks should be inspected no later than one year after the last time you checked them.

Ground and elevated tanks are required to be inspected inside and out every year. Pressure tanks also need to be inspected on the outside every year and if they have an inspection port they are required to have the interior inspected once every five years. The grounds and facilities shall be maintained in a manner so as to minimize the possibility of the harboring of rodents, insects, and other disease vectors, and in such a way as to prevent other conditions that might cause the contamination of the water.  (1) Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.    (A) Ground and elevated storage tank inspections must determine that the vents are in place and properly screened, the roof hatches closed and locked, flap valves and gaskets provide adequate protection against insects, rodents, and other vermin, the interior and exterior coating systems are continuing to provide adequate protection to all metal surfaces, and the tank remains in a watertight condition.  

It is extremely important these facilities be properly inspected, we recently inspected a ground storage tank that had a damaged vent screen, inside on the floor of the tank we found two dead rats. Not what you want in a water tank that you are drinking out of. Birds and insects are much more common, it there is a hole in the vent screen that you can put your finger in you can bet there are insects in the tank. It the hole is big enough to put your fist in there is a good chance you will find a dead bird. On a hot day, the animals can smell the water if there is a way for them to get it they will. Like a big lobster trap they can get in but they can’t get out. Let’s take a look at your tanks!

We have several inspections to choose from:

  • Remote Underwater Video – This is is our most popular and economical inspection. We document all State required inspection points. Our report is delivered in a notebook with photographs of inspection points and an underwater video that covers the interior roof, water surface, waterline and underwater areas visible from our remote underwater camera and lighting system.
  • Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV)- Covers everything above with additional underwater video taken from one of our ROV’s. This allows you to get a more detailed inspection for much larger facilities. It also allows a customer to get great documentation on specific areas if needed.
  • Diver Inspection– Our potable water dive crew is usually reserved to clean water storage tanks and towers. The divers are sealed in their own environment using a DRY SUIT. No part of the divers body touches the water in addition, to meet state and federal requirements divers are washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution. Divers are able to get an even more detailed inspection.
  • Tank Cleaning and Inspection– All of our inspections include an underwater video of tank floors. This allows us to get a good estimate of accumulated sediment. It is important to know how much sediment is in the tank. Sediment on the floor of the tank that can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses. Our cleaning service removes all loose sediment. After the sediment is removed we are able to see the floor of the tank allowing us to document the condition of the paint and see corroded areas if any. When is the last time your tanks were cleaned?

If you are task with inspecting your own tank we can help with that too. I teach a course at the Environmental Training Institute (ETI) located at the UT Arlington Division for Enterprise Development. The class is 16 hours over two days and has class dates scheduled in 2021 and 2022.

WTR 308 Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques

Course NameMeetsBeginsEndsFee
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesW&Th 8:30 A–5:30 P09/29/2109/30/21650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh&F 8:30 AM–5:30 P08/18/2208/19/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques (Online)Th& F 8:30 A–5:30 P04/14/2204/15/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh& F 8:30 A–5:30 P12/08/2212/09/22650.00

If you cant make the class I also offer a review of what you need to look at online see:

www.watertankinspecton.co – A DIY Guide to Inspecting Potable Water Storage Tanks.

Last in Texas you will need to maintain a Water Tank Inspection Log

PWS Water Tank Inspection Log – Texas.gov

If we may be of service please contact us.

For a free quote for inspection or cleaning e-mail Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com or call 817-377-4899.

For more info see; www.ronperrin.com or or blog www.tankdiver.us.

E. coli has been found in many drinking water systems, but what is it?

Escherichia coli, commonly referred to as E. coli, is in a group of organisms known as coliforms: 
common bacteria found in the digestive system of humans and animals.

There are only a few strains that cause serious disease in humans. One of these strains is responsible for causing Traveler’s diarrhea, and the second is E. coli O157:H7, which contaminates meat and leafy vegetables. 

Under a high magnification of 6836X, this digitally-colorized, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image depicted a growing cluster of Gram-negative, rod-shaped, Escherichia coli bacteria, of the strain O157:H7, which is a pathogenic strain of E. coli.
Source: CDC/ National Escherichia, Shigella, Vibrio Reference Unit at CDC – Photo Credit; Janice Haney Carr 2006.

The “O157:H7” strain has caused serious hemorrhagic diarrhea and for some, long term complications resulting in illness and even death in some cases.


The presence of E. coli is used as an indicator to monitor the possible presence of other more harmful microbes, such as Giardia, Shigella, Norovirus and the Protozoa Cryptosporidium. Diseases resulting from contact with water contaminated by E. coli can cause gastrointestinal illness, skin, ear, respiratory, eye, neurologic, and wound infections. The most commonly reported symptoms are diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, and low-grade fever. When E. coli exceeds the permissible level in recreational water, it results in the closing of public swimming pools and fishing areas.

Some possible sources of fecal contamination include: wildlife, agricultural runoff or runoff from areas contaminated with livestock manure, wastewater treatment plants, or private septic systems. Heavy rain may cause organisms to be washed into waterways, lakes or ground water. If contaminated water is then used as a source of drinking water and is not treated, or is inadequately treated, it may result in illness.

When this contaminant makes its way into a drinking water system sediment found on the bottom of water storage tanks can provide a safe habitat. E. coli along with other bacteria and pathogens, can find shelter from disinfectants under the the soft sediment that accumulates in storage tanks..

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list E. coli as one of the top 10 Causes of outbreaks in public water systems.

The best way to insure that E. coli or other bacteria will not invade your tank sediment is to remove it. Clean your water storage tanks then maintain them by getting them on a cleaning schedule.

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks and towers. Our inspection methods cover all state required inspection points. We also include a video produced by a underwater camera and lighting system that are able to properly inspect the interior floors of your facilities to determine sediment levels. We do all of this with no disruption in service and no water loss.

Our potable water dive team can keep your tanks clean with no disruption in service and minimal water loss. When sediment is removed the habitat that allows bacteria and other contaminants to remain in your tank is also gone. This allows the disinfectants like chlorine to do a much more effective job. Our customers report to us that they use less chlorine, after their tanks are cleaned to meet standards. For more information go to: www.ronperrin.com, send an e-mail to perrinsales@gmail.com or call 817-377-4899 for a quote today.

Reference: CDC Water-related Diseases and Contaminants in Public Water Systems – . Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems

E. coli – CDC –Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. E. coli are a large and diverse group of bacteria. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick. Some kinds of E. coli can cause diarrhea, while others cause urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia, and other illnesses.

See more here: https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/index.html

In 2020 Texas officials Found Brain-Eating microbe in water supply

Sep 26, 2020 Texas residents warned of tap water tainted with brain-eating microbe. Texas officials have warned residents of some communities near Houston to stop using tap water because it might be tainted with a deadly brain-eating microbe.

The Guardian Reported:

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) warned the Brazosport Water Authority late on Friday of the potential contamination of its water supply by Naegleria fowleri.

The commission issued an advisory warning people not to use tap water for any reason except to flush toilets in Lake Jackson, Freeport, Angleton, Brazoria, Richwood, Oyster Creek, Clute and Rosenberg.

Those communities are home to about 120,000 people. Also affected are the Dow Chemical works in Freeport, which has 4,200 employees, and the Clemens and Wayne Scott state prison units, which have 2,345 inmates and 655 employees.

PFAS have been detected in the drinking water of more than 1,400 communities in 49 states, according to research.

The advisory will remain in place until the Brazosport authority’s water system has been thoroughly flushed and tests on water samples show the system’s water is safe to use. It said in a statement that it was unclear how long it would be before the tap water was safe.

See the full story here:


With everything going on last year I missed this story. My take on this story is one of the reasons I got into diving water tanks in the first place. To explain why this story made me think about how I came to build a company that puts divers into water storage tanks I need to tell you something about myself and even about my parents.

In the early 1990s I was working as a Texas police officer, and my passion was SCUBA Diving. My love of SCUBA Diving goes back even farther. My dad was Charles B. Perrin, he passed in 2016 at the age of 78. He claims to have purchased the first Aqua-Lung in Fort Worth in the mid 1950’s. He had to order it from a welding supply long before the first SCUBA store opened in Texas. Both my mom and dad spent time water-skiing and SCUBA diving on Possum Kingdom Lake (PK) west of Fort Worth on the Brazos River. They were both civil servants: my dad worked for the IRS and my Mom was an Executive for the Corps of Engineers. Raising their family in the 60’s-80″s this solid middle class income gave them enough extra money to not only afford to give us a great middle class lifestyle, it also allowed them to purchase a second home, something that seems out of reach for most of us today.

They purchased a lake house on Possum Kingdom Lake (PK) where I spent most of the weekends of my youth. Even before they purchased the first lake property my dad had taken me out to PK in a small fishing boat with his one set of Scuba Gear and instructed me how to SCUBA dive. In 1971, I was 12 years old. The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) was not even founded until 1966. My dad predated standard training practices that would come along after his diving years were done. With no formal courses available my parents taught themselves how to dive with the help of “The Skin Diver” (later renamed Skin Diver Magazine). Sea Hunt starring Lloyd Bridges*, was also a favorite TV program in our home. I personally would not get formally trained and certified until the early 1980’s.

I can still remember my first dive. I was so excited. It was a clear summer day and our 14′ “Little Dude” fiberglass fishing boat was anchored in a remote area over crystal clear water about 10′ deep. I put dad’s tank, mask and fins on just like Lloyd Bridges. I checked the regulator which gave me that great scuba diving sound as cold compressed air shot into my mouth from the 72 cubic inch steel tank strapped to my back. I sat on the side of the boat and dad explained to me how to make entry by going over backwards.

“Hold on to your mask,” he said as he pushed me over the side. The water was cold on my hot sun soaked skin, my heart rate shot up and I was breathing was as rapid as I could breath! I was sure I was going to die as I tried to get my head above water. Turning myself around underwater I shot back to the surface with all my strength but I was stopped by my dad putting his hand on my head and holding me underwater until my breathing finally slowed down and my initial panic subsided. My dad was the worst SCUBA instructor ever! Despite that first dive experience that could best be described as violent or even brutal, I fell in love with diving. By the time I was 14 I was exploring the lake on my own spearfishing in the many coves and inlets. I never had a buddy to dive with but I always had a sharp knife in case I got tanged in an abandoned trout line that seemed to be everywhere I wanted to dive.

Growing up on the lake the brain-eating ameba Naegleria fowleri is something I have been aware of most of my life at least as far back as I can remember. Diving and Water Skiing were my favorite things to do on the lake. In late summer the river flow would slow down. The water going through the dam would be reduced and water become more stagnant. At the same time the hot summer sun warms the water. Naegleria fowleri  loves warm water and in late summer Texas lake water gets very warm. I remember news stories from water skiers (usually teenaged children) getting the organism in their nose and dying from it, going back to my teenage years. When the lake level went down too low we stopped diving and water skiing.

When cooler weather arrives in mid September, Naegleria fowleri lies dormant in the sediment at the bottom of lakes and riverbeds, which is why experts advise that you not stir up any more of that sludge/sediment than necessary. First discovered in 1899, Naegleria fowleri is a protist pathogen, known to infect the central nervous system and produce primary amoebic meningoencephalitis.

In 1991 I discovered that the American Water Works Association had a standard to put scuba divers into drinking water. Using a drysuit and a full face mask, a diver could be totally isolated from the water supply. To meet the standard that has been adopted by the USEPA and TCEQ the diver must also be washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution. Taking the tank out of service and then decontaminating the entire facility with very expensive and time consuming super chlorination procedure. Decontamination of the diver is much more economical. In addition other advantages are the diver can move around all underwater areas. Equipped with a good underwater lighting and camera system the diver can document the condition of the facility and deliver a great inspection report with no water loss or disruption in service. After I mastered diving in potable water I saw a common problem potable water tanks have – over time, sediment collects on the floor of tanks.

I read everything I could about tank sediment. In 1990 the National Drinking Water Advisory Council stated that drinking water contamination from bacteria, protozoa and viruses may be the biggest challenge for drinking water professionals in the future. The future is here, over time almost all tanks collect sediment. Tank sediment can be a safe habitat for a wide host of microbes including crypto and Naegleria fowleri.

When I ask about sediment removal I was told the standard method was a bucket and a shovel. We immediately started working on a better way. First using some methods developed for moving sand to look for treasure off-shore a much simpler method was developed by 1999. We now use a 3″ trash pump to clean most ground storage tanks and with water towers we simply use gravity to create all the suction we need to quickly remove sediment from the floor of the tank. Cleaning water storage tanks is not as common as you may think. Our company inspects over seven hundred tanks a year. Every week we find tanks that have never been cleaned. Currently there are no USEPA rules on when tanks should be cleaned. Texas has administrative rules under 290.46 requiring all potable water storage to be inspected annually. However, Texas along with most other states, have no rules on how often water storage tanks should be cleaned. The interior of water tanks often remain, “Out-of-sight and out-of-mind”.

Photo: Potable Water Diver wearing a dry suit and Kirby Morgan B-17 Diving Helmet

KEEPING WATER STORAGE TANKS CLEAN IS IMPORTANT

This story is about communities on the lower part of the Brazos River that have had Naegleria fowleri turn up in their drinking water system. The standard remediation for this is often to perform a chlorine burn that increases the chlorine to a high level. This kills all contaminants it comes into contact with. So everything on the surface in the water system that is underwater, including all tanks and water mains is sanitized. But what about the contaminants that remain hidden under a layer of sediment in the water storage tank? Administrators often are unaware of any tank sediment that may still be lurking in water storage tanks again, Out-of-sight and out-of- mind. The chlorine burn will kill all contaminants on the surface of the sediment. This is why proper tank inspections that can determine the actual sediment levels are so important. One half to three inches of sediment is very common. Without removing the sediment, contaminants remain in the tank and will continue to be a problem in the future. All water storage tanks should be on a cleaning schedule. Some tanks may need to be cleaned annually while others may be able to be on a three or five year program.

Photo Above: Remotely controlled Cleaning Robot being deployed on a 158′ standpipe water storage tank

First established in 1997, Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the underwater inspection and cleaning of water storage tanks and towers. We offer three different inspection methods: 1) remote camera, 2) Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and 3) Potable Water Diver. Our divers are commercially trained from great schools like The Ocean Corporation where I serve on the Educational Advisory Board. We offer diver cleaning with no disruption in service and minimal water loss on ground and elevated tanks. For standpipes over 70 feet tall we have a Robot Cleaning Service.

See more about what we do and how we do it at our website at: www.ronperrin.com.

Also check out our new video series: www.TapTalk.blog.


Please Support the Guardian. Unlike many others, Guardian journalism is available for everyone to read, regardless of what they can afford to pay. We do this because we believe in information equality. Greater numbers of people can keep track of global events, understand their impact on people and communities, and become inspired to take meaningful action. CLICK HERE.

*Sea Hunt is an American action adventure television series that aired in syndication from 1958 to 1961 and was popular for decades afterwards. Click Hear to watch Sea Hunt

Other References:

Naegleria fowleri is responsible for the death of a 6-year-old boy in Lake Jackson, Texas, and environmental officials say the city will be fighting the pathogen for months TPO ARTICLE HERE.

Texas Monthly – “The Risk Of Exposure To Brain-Eating Amoeba Spikes In The Summer Months”

Do you need to inspect your own water storage tank? See our DIY Guide to Inspecting Potable Water Storage Tanks. HERE: www.watertankinspection.co

Water Tank Inspector Wanted

WATER TANK INSPECTOR WANTED

We are seeking experienced Water Utility Worker to perform tank inspections and general water tank maintenance procedures. No criminal history and good driving record are required.  Confined space and fall protection training is required before employment and may be done online.  Underwater camera and ROV training will also be provided.

Preference is given to persons who have climbing experience. You must be in good physical condition and able to climb 150ft straight ladders on water towers. We are only taking applications from persons who currently live in the north-central Texas area (in or near the DFW metro area). We have a full-time opening working out of our Main Office in Ft Worth, Tx. This position requires frequent out-of-town travel (2-5 days a week, often work on a 4 day work week with 3 days off). A valid Driver’s license and a good driving record are required. For additional information and application see our blog at www.taptalk.blog

Requirements.

  • Must be able to work at heights, we inspect and clean water storage towers.
  • Must be 18 years of age or older
  • Must have high school diploma or equivalent
  • Must have a valid driver license
  • Must be able to pass a pre-employment background check
  • Must be able to pass a pre-employment drug screen, heavy drinkers need not apply*.
  • Must be legally authorized to work in the United States
  • Must live in, or relocate to, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.
  • Our office is 100% Vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus.  Due to the fact that COVID-19 Vaccines are Widely Available, applicants must be vaccinated before scheduling an in person interview*.  

Preferred Qualifications.

  • Confined Space Training
  • Fall Protection Training
  • OSHA – 10 Hour or 30 Hour Construction Course certificate
  • O2 Provider certification
  • NDT certification(s)
  • Rigging

This is a general job description. In some cases, it may not describe all tasks that may be assigned. We maintain a drug-free workplace. The position requires the successful completion of drug screening and background checks before going on some Federal Contracts, failure to pass these checks may result in dismissal before or after completion of a probationary period.

Diversity Statement (EEO)
Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. Qualified applicants receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, national origin or ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, religion, age, disability, gender identity, genetic information, service in the military, or any other status protected by law.

We are looking for persons currently living in or near north-central Texas (in or near DFW). For an interview Call 817-377-4899 (voice only).

Job Types: Full-time, Part-time out of town travel is required.

Pay: $120.00 – $160.00 per day

*If you feel the need to drink alcohol every day this may not be where you want to work. We prefer to hire individuals who can work several days a week “on the road” without drinking alcohol and of course without any illegal drug use. While their is nothing wrong with having a few beers after work, occasionally people may have too much to drink too late at night. When climbing on water towers we need our employees to be 100% alert and not hung over. Alcohol use also tends to dehydrate people, this can be a safety concern when climbing on a hot and often very hot water tank or tower. We are serious about safety.

*COVID-19 considerations:
We perform weekly COVID 19 tests on employees. Currently, our staff is 100% vaccinated. We are seeking someone who has or is willing to get a COVID-19 vaccination.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Top Ten Reasons to clean your potable water storage tanks in 2021

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow GiardiaLegionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tank and tower cleaning rates are affordable and we have special pricing for tiny tanks under 10,000 gallons.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

Check out our new video series on YouTube. Tap-Talk explores our water distribution systems as we take you along and let you see what we see as we inspect and clean municipal water storage tanks. Our cameras let you see what is inside, we never reveal the utility we are working for or our exact location unless our customer gives us permission. Episode #1 is posted below, less than six minutes, I explain what we do and how we do it, talk about my background and what led me to start my company in 1997.

Episode Two:

There is a serious danger lurking in many water systems. Join me, along with microbiologists and a former EPA drinking water chief as they discuss the problem. If you like this video please give us a thumbs up and SHARE it! It is important that water utility managers understand the importance of keeping water storage tanks clean. PLEASE SHARE!

Episode Three:

Wallie is a Deep Trekker DT640VAC robot crawler we use to clean water storage tanks that have deep water. The Deep Trekker DT640 robot crawler can work it water up to 165 feet deep. To see more check out our blog at http://www.tankdiver.us. To contact our office please call 817-377-4899 or contact Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com

Want More? This video is a 15 minute look back at some of the jobs we have done over the past three years.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899 or

e-mail Robert Perrin at perrinsales@gmail.com

Our Best Photo of 2020

Since 1997 we have been inspecting and cleaning potable water storage tanks and towers. Our crews take hundreds and often over a thousand photos a week. Of course, most are a little on the boring side documenting the inspection points of water tanks and towers. Occasionally we turn the cameras on ourselves as we do the work and those are the photos I use to promote our service.

Every time I see this photo I think about how it nails down what we do. I think it was the best of 2020. It is one of our divers cleaning a GST potable water storage facility. The tanks are always a lot cleaner when we are done, about half way through you can see a lot of sediment on the floor and less that perfectly clear water, it is a real working photo, not something produced in perfect pool water conditions.

Here are some other photos I found to be impressive in 2020 I hope you like them too.

Our Favorite ROBOT Tank Cleaning Photos!

Water Tank Inspection. Water Tank Cleaning.

KEEPING DRINKING WATER SAFE

Our goal is to get people thinking about their water, and allow utility officials to understand the choices they have when it comes to inspecting and cleaning potable water storage tanks and towers. 

For more information about our inspection or cleaning services See: www.watertankinspection.com

Be sure to subscribe to our new video series Tap Talk at: www.taptalk.blog

Like our FaceBook page at: https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

Contact Information: Phone 817-377-4899 E-mail perrinsales@gmail.com

The Water Tower and Outer Space Connection with Neil deGrasse Tyson

It turns out that Neil deGrasse Tyson @neilty is a fan of Water Towers.

In this short video Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how water towers work and their connection to outer space. Neil has spent his life in the study of astronomy, and while it is true SPACE is the final frontier, the inner space of a municipal water tank is where the battle for the universe is actually being fought. Every day my divers work in a space with no oxygen. We remove microscopic bacteria and a wide range of other contaminants threatening the health of our drinking water here on earth.

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow GiardiaLegionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tower cleaning rates start at only $2,450.00. Affordable protection for your water storage tanks affordable safety for the people you serve.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers.

We serve municipal water utilities, federal parks and prisons and private industry. We deploy underwater cameras or remotely operated vehicles to perform inspections of drinking water tanks.

Our methods save our customers millions of gallons of treated drinking water every year.  If the facility needs to be cleaned our potable water dive team can remove tank sediment with minimal water loss and little to no disruption in service. For more information visit: www.watertankinspection.com

To get a cleaning proposal please call 817-377-4899 or contact Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com.