Have your potable water storage tanks been cleaned lately ?

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Potable Water Tank cleaning

Photo: Sediment being removed from Potable Water Storage Tank.

*       The American Water Works Association recommends that tanks be cleaned at least every three years.  Recent focus on pharmaceuticals in water systems have made more people than ever aware of contaminates that may be lurking in their water supply.   Although pharmaceuticals in drinking water may be in the news the real threat is random bacteria and cryptosporidium spores.

The Threat of Bacteria-

Countless kinds of bacteria can make their way into a public water supply.  Chlorine and other treatment methods are our first line of defense.  When potable water storage tanks are clean small amounts of bacteria that survive the treatment process cycle through the system undetected and harmless due to the small quantity.  Sediment in the tank can capture and harbor these small amounts of bacteria.  The bacteria can start to grow hidden from chlorine deep in the sediment.  Chlorine can even be overwhelmed and depleted if a nitrate eating bacteria is collected.   As the bacteria continues to grow in the sediment month after month and year after year the threat to public health grows.       

  The Threat of Cryptosporidium

The threat of cryptosporidium outbreak is even greater with sediment in the floor of a water storage tank.   Again Sediment can harbor bacteria, cryptosporidium and other contaminates.  The best defense to insure a protozoa like  cryptosporidium will not take up residence in your water storage system may be to keep the tanks free of sediment.  In the Spring of 1993 over 100 people died as a result of a cryptosporidium outbreak that was directly associated with the Howard Avenue Water Purification Plant.  This was the largest water born disease ever documented in United States history.  It is estimated that over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea.  

Due to the fact that cryptosporidium is a protozoa parasite with a thick outer shell it is highly resistant to disinfectants such as chlorine.  The best defense to ensure it will not inhabit your water system may be to make sure your water tanks remain sediment free.  This will remove and habitat that small amounts bacteria or protozoa could lodge and grow in, Preventing possible public health problem in the most simple way.  Keeping water storage tanks clean.    

Sediment being removed

Photo: Sediment being removed from Potable Water Storage Tank.

What is in the floor of your tank Call RON PERRIN to find out 1-888-481-1768

See www.ronperrin.com  for more details.

Cleaning Potable Water Storage Tanks is what we do

Divers prepare to go into a potable water storage tank

Divers prepare to go into a potable water storage tank by washing down with a 200ppm chlorine solution.  On this date 3 to 6 inches of sediment was removed form a 300,000 gallon tank.

Diver entering potable water

The certified diver is wearing a dry suit and full face mask.  The dry suit ensures that no part of the divers body touches the water.  All of the equipment is purchased for and only used in potable water.  Many off-shore companies have a hard time sticking to this rule when they only work in potable water tanks occasionally.  RON PERRIN WATER TECHNOLOGIES divers work in potable water every week.  Potable water inspection and tank cleaning is #1 job.

Having your water tanks inspected and cleaned when needed is the best way to insure the health of your system.

Call us today toll free at 1-888-481-1768.  Or fax a list of your tanks and sizes to 817-246-1740 for a QUICK QUOTE!

Divers Clean Water Storage Tanks

logo.jpgSince 1992 divers have been a part of keeping water tanks clean in Texas.  Divers are washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution using gear that is purchased for and only used in potable water.  No part of the divers body touches the water.  Using a specially equipped  pump or air lift system they are then able to remove the sediment from the floor of the tank.   This is the most effective way to clean a potable water storage tank because it removes sediment that can be a habitat for bacteria and other contaminants.  Everything that is loose is removed  without damage to painted surfaces. This allows the chlorine in the system to more effectively do its job.