On the NEWS with i-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.  

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The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.

This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

Sediment being removed

Sediment being removed

Safe tap water is something everyone should have.

Crew Prepares for Dive

Crew Prepares for Dive

                                          Click Here to see:    CBS DFW_ VIDEO

 

NEWSsinc.com VIDEO

     SEE THE FULL STORY HERE: 

CBS 11 DFW NEWS STORY  http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

This story aired on 

Thanks for taking the time to check this out.

Photos taken by

RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan

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Deadly amoeba found in a U.S. drinking water system

August 2013, the death of a 4-year-old boy staying near Violet, Louisiana, was linked to the naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a slip and slide connected to the St. Bernard Parish’s water system that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba.

More common in Australia NBC news reported that this was the first case in the U.S.

For more see: “Four year old’s Death linked to Rare Amoeba in Water System”

Keeping the city’s potable water storage tanks and towers clean may be more important now than ever!

Over time almost all tanks accumulate sediment on the floor. Any amount of sediment can become a habitat for bacteria, protozoa (like Cryptosporidium) and viruses. However, when tests show chlorine depletion, the idea of removing the sediment is usually not thought of. Additional treatment chemicals are usually the first line of defense, quickly becoming chemical warfare and potentially leaving the tank with low, or no, chlorine protection for long periods. American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that potable water storage tanks be cleaned every 3 to five years. Few states actually require tanks to be cleaned on a regular basis, and some don’t require it at all.

When a contaminant (bacteria, protozoa or viruses) enters a water storage tank and finds sediment to get a foothold in, chlorine can be quickly depleted while the contaminants grow under the protection of the sediment. Even otherwise harmless bacteria can help to deplete chlorine reserves leaving the tank vulnerable to more dangerous contaminants.

Removing sediment from the floor of potable water storage tanks greatly reduces the chance that any contaminant can get a foothold in the distribution system and grow to become a larger problem.

So why isn’t cleaning potable water storage tanks a common practice? Removing tanks from service to perform cleaning is time consuming and expensive. The smaller the water utility, the more difficult it is to find the budget for preventive maintenance.  There are many contractors that offer Potable Water Dive crews that can remove floor sediment with little or no down time and minimal water loss. Using a qualified potable water dive crew to clean water storage tanks can save the water utility time and water.

Keeping potable water storage tanks free of accumulated sediment is essential for the health of the system and the health of your customers. If you administer a drinking water system, make a plan to schedule cleanings and stick to it.

References:

For more information on Potable Water Divers see:  www.ronperrin.com

For more information on Naegleria fowleri amoeba in drinking water see:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/public-water-systems.html

NOTE: You cannot be infected with Naegleria fowleri by drinking contaminated water. In very rare instances, Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or contaminated tap water) enters the nose. (For example: when people submerge their heads or cleanse their noses during religious practices, and when people irrigate their sinuses (nose) using contaminated tap water.)

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 

Cryptosporidium Drinking Water Health Advisory  EPA  March 2001

Recent Water Tower Cleaning had a few surprises

Sediment Samples from tower cleaning

Potable water tower

Sediment Being Removed from the interior floor of tower

Sediment Being Removed from the interior floor of tower

We recently cleaned a potable water storage tower that had not been cleaned since it was built in the mid 1980’s.  This facility was in compliance, it had been inspected once a year, but due to the fact that there are no set rules on when to clean water storage tanks in Texas it had never been cleaned.

Sediment sample

Sediment sample

We used a Celestron LED digital microscope to take a close look at the sediment removed from the floor of the tank.  I posted what we found on my blog titled: THE CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT at www.ronperrin.us.  Due to the fact that rules on inspecting and cleaning potable water storage facilities vary greatly from state to state we may soon see changes in this area of Federal Regulation.

Currently most states do not have specific rules on when potable water storage tanks should be cleaned.

Please visit my CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT blog and take the poll a few post down from the top.  I would like feedback if you think the EPA should make a standardized requirement of cleaning and inspection of the nations drinking water tanks and towers.

If you are on LINKED IN please Join my network HERE.

THE BOOK

THE BOOK

DO YOU NEED YOUR WATER STORAGE TANK OR TOWER Inspected or CLEANED?  Call 888-481-1768

ARE YOU HAVING TROUBLE GETTING THE FUNDS YOU NEED to Inspect or clean your water storage tank?
YOU NEED MY BOOK! Show your Director, or Manager what sediment looks like that builds up in water tanks over time!

CHAPTER FOUR covers Contaminates In our Water!

CHAPTER SEVEN covers Inspection Methods.

CHAPTER EIGHT covers Cleaning Methods with color photos of sediment being removed!

CLICK HERE To Order: Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage by Ron Perrin

Tank and Tower cleaning Service

Our Potable Water Divers are able to inspect or clean water storage tanks and towers with no disruption in service and minimal water loss.  Our equipment is purchased for and only used in potable water.  Our divers are Commercially certified through training approved by the Association of Diving Contractors.      Call toll free 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank