Meet Wallie Our Standpipe Cleaning Robot

“Wallie” is our DT640 VAC Deep Trekker Crawler Robot that we have purchased to clean standpipes. Standpipes typically have deeper water than other potable water storage tanks, with water depth often over 100 feet. Wallie can operate safely in water up to 168 feet deep. This will be a big asset to water utilities that do not want to take their standpipe out of service to remove the sediment from the floor of the tank.

It is important to keep potable water storage tanks and towers clean. Sediment builds up over time. A layer of sediment in your water storage tank or tower may allow bacteria, protozoa, viruses or other organisms to get a foothold in your water storage tank, grow, and become a community health problem.

Keeping your tank clean will also save you money! Our customers report that they use less chlorine to meet water quality standards after we clean their storage facility.

Since 1997, Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in underwater inspections and tank cleanings. We offer a wider range of inspection and cleaning choices depending on your needs. Our underwater inspections may be performed with a Remote Underwater Video Camera, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), or for the most detail, we also offer a Diver Inspection. We have a Small Tank Cleaning Service for tanks from 1,000 to 10,000 gallons, Robot Cleaning for Standpipes and our Potable Water Dive Crew is a good fit for most other facilities. Call today for a free quote: 1-888-481-1768.

(c) Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. 2020 www.ronperrin.us

In-Service municipal water tank inspection and cleaning

Our business is to help water utilities keep drinking water up to standards and safe to drink. We save utilities time, and money while saving millions of gallons of treated drinking water each month (sometimes each day). 

We do this by inspecting water storage tanks with remote cameras while they remain in-service and full of drinking water.  If the tank or the water tower has sediment build up our potable water dive crew can remove sediment from the facility with minimal water loss and usually no disruption in service.

Ron Perrin – Inspecting water tanks and towers since 1997.

This process removes bacteria, protozoa, and even viruses that can live, thrive and grow in the tank sediment that builds-up on the floor of virtually every water storage facility.  Your zip code should not determine how safe your municipal water is to drink.

Our remote camera inspections are very affordable and our cleaning process cost much less than draining and removing the tank from service for cleaning. Of the top eleven contaminates for municipal drinking water systems according to the CDC, our method of removing tank sediment eliminates the habitat that eight of them can use to get a foothold in water systems.

Water Tank Cleaning
Water tank cleaning with potable water dive crew.

Photo: Potable Water Storage tank being cleaned by potable water dive crew.

For a quote to inspect or clean your municipal water tanks or towers give us a call toll free at 888-481-1768.

Visit our web page at: www.watertankinspection.com

We Are All in This Together

Being a human being like most of you, I have political opinions and feelings like everyone else. I try to separate my personal feelings from my business life but that is getting harder to do all the time.

Potable water tank cleaning

Keeping your tanks clean may be more important now than ever. Sediment on the floor of your water storage tank may become an inviting habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to get a foothold in your water system.

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been here to help water utilities inspect and clean water storage tanks and towers. We work for everyone, every type of person with every kind of skin tone and all political stripes with equal enthusiasm. Some I agree with and some I don’t, but since I am not a politician, how my customers think is not my business.

Lately, I have had to unfriend some folks because of the hate speech they have been posting or re-posting on face-book. I do not have time for hate in my life. You may not see the world as I do and we can agree to disagree on just about everything, but I draw the line at posting hate.

Water tank & tower inspection and cleaning
Water tank & tower inspection and cleaning

Recently, even wearing a mask during a pandemic has gotten politicized. For months I have been posting photos of my crew and me wearing masks. This is not political. It is a practical way for my company to keep helping water utility companies keep their water tanks and towers inspected and clean.

If you have contact with the public in any way you should wear a mask. I hope this gets understood by everyone sooner rather than later. No matter what or how you think, we are all in this together and the sooner we come together, the sooner we will stop the spread of Covid-19.

Dig deep into your wealth of compassion for your fellow man and wear a mask in public. It doesn’t matter if you’re red or blue – it just matters that you did your part to stop the spread!

Our professional dive crew can be a valuable part of your tank maintenance program.

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Keeping your tank clean removes the habitat that bacteria, protozoa and even viruses can use to get a foothold in your water system.
What is the top reason to clean your tank?
Microorganisms
Microorganisms can use the sediment that builds up on the floor of almost all potable water storage tanks and towers to get a foothold in the water system. Hidden from treatment chemicals under the protection of the sediment these contaminants can grow until they deplete chlorine reserves and become a public health problem.
Microorganisms causing waterborne diseases include protozoa and bacteria, many of which are intestinal parasites, or invade the tissues or circulatory system through walls of the digestive tract. Various other waterborne diseases are caused by viruses. (In spite of philosophical difficulties associated with defining viruses as “organisms”, it is practical and convenient to regard them as microorganisms in this context.)
Removing the sediment removes the habitat that allows these microbes to remain hidden in your water system and thrive.
I found a great article on contaminants found in potable water check this out.

Water Tower Inspection and Cleaning

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Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers.

Water Tower cleaning.

Sediment removal from water tower.

We serve municipal water utilities, federal parks and prisons and private industry. We deploy underwater cameras or remotely operated vehicles to perform inspections of drinking water tanks.

Our methods save our customers millions of gallons of treated drinking water every year.  If the facility needs to be cleaned our potable water dive team can remove tank sediment with minimal water loss and little to no disruption in service.

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow Giardia, Legionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tower cleaning rates start at only $2,450.00. Affordable protection for your water storage tanks affordable safety for the people you serve.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

We are here when you need us!

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Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry.  We use remotely operated underwater video cameras to get the most information for the lowest possible cost. We are able to inspect your tanks inside and out with no water loss or disruption in service.

Diver.Entry.March.2020 copy

If your water tank or tower needs to be cleaned our potable water dive crew can remove all loose sediment from the floor of the facility with minimal water loss. Give us a call at 817-377-4899 for a free quote. Check out and like our Facebook page facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

 

Do you still need a reason to clean your water storage tanks

Sediment on the floor of your water storage tank is a Breach in your system. The more sediment you have in your water storage tanks the bigger your risk for having a water-related contaminant issue. Tank sediment builds up over time and can provide a wide range of contaminants including viruses a way to get a foothold in your water system. The tank sediment can provide a safe habitat allowing a small number of bacteria or viruses to quickly grow into the billions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released a guidance and fact sheet on transmission of the novel coronavirus in water.

THE GOOD: The agency stated: “Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.”

THE BAD: The fact is other viruses are found in drinking water, in fact you will find them in the top ten contaminants. Including Hepatitis A, a vaccine-preventable, communicable disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), and Norovirus. A very contagious virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea. Conventional water treatment methods should also prevent these viruses from contaminating drinking water systems but they remain in the top ten of drinking water-related contaminants.

Here is the top ten list of Water-related Diseases and Contaminants the CDC found in in Public Water Systems.

The United States has one of the safest public drinking water supplies in the world. Over 286 million Americans get their tap water from a community water system (1). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates drinking water quality in public water systems and sets maximum concentration levels for water chemicals and pollutants.

Sources of drinking water are subject to contamination and require appropriate treatment to remove disease-causing contaminants. Contamination of drinking water supplies can occur in the source water as well as in the distribution system after water treatment has already occurred. There are many sources of water contamination, including naturally occurring chemicals and minerals (for example, arsenic, radon, uranium), local land use practices (fertilizers, pesticides, concentrated feeding operations), manufacturing processes, and sewer overflows or wastewater releases.

The presence of contaminants in water can lead to adverse health effects, including gastrointestinal illness, reproductive problems, and neurological disorders. Infants, young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people whose immune systems are compromised because of AIDS, chemotherapy, or transplant medications, may be especially susceptible to illness from some contaminants.

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*
Giardia
Legionella
Norovirus
Shigella
Campylobacter
Copper
Salmonella
Hepatitis A
Cryptosporidium
E. coli, excess fluoride (tie)

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Source: CDC https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html

Why Isn’t ChlorineTreatment Enough?

I had some water utility workers ask me, “Why isn’t chlorine treatment of potable water enough to keep water safe? Why should we worry about cleaning tanks when we already use chlorine?”

Chlorine works great as long as there is not a breach in the tank. When there is a breach like a hole in the top that lets birds and insects inside the tank, the chlorine can not keep up. This is why annual tank inspections are so important. People have died from this scenario, see: “Salmonella Outbreak in Alamosa, Colorado“. According to USEPA officials a sediment build up on the interior floor of a water storage tank is another type of breach. Bacteria like Legionella, protozoa like Cryptosporidium, and a wide range of viruses including Norovirus can hide and GROW in the tank sediment.

Do you know what the #1 cause of municipal water contamination is? According to the CDC it is a microscopic parasite called Giardia. The sediment becomes a perfect habitat providing both shelter and food for Giardia and many other microorganisms to grow. In time, the contaminants can reach a point where they overwhelm chlorine or any other disinfectant you may be using. Keeping tanks clean keeps your drinking water safe.

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

For a complete listing of water-related surveillance data, see CDC’s Surveillance Reports for Drinking Water-associated Disease & Outbreaks.

A professional potable water Dive Crew can remove tank sediment along with everything that is growing in it with minimal water loss.  The diver is sealed in a DRY suit so there is no human contact with the water supply.  He can then enter the tank and make quick work of removing tank sediment and any contaminant that may be hiding in it.  Give us a call toll free at 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

For more information on Municipal Water Tank Cleaning see: Ron Perrin Water Technologies web Site: www.rpwt.us.

Content source: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Inspecting Water Storage since 1997

As we are getting close to the end of 2019, it seems to be the time of the year when we look back at where we have been.  Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers in Texas and 14 other states.  We have learned a lot over the years and we still strive to deliver the best services at the lowest prices. One of the ways we do that is by limiting our contracting to what we are very good at, and that is inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers.  If you are one of our customers we would like to say THANK YOU!  If you are looking for an inspection contractor give us a call and see why our customers call us back year after year. .

Ron.Perrin.2019

Call toll free: 1-888-481-1768Ron.

 

Water Tank Inspection – Shopping for a Potable Water Tank Inspector? Think about This-

Here are a few things to consider when shopping for a contractor to perform work in a potable water storage tank.

  1. Look for a specialist
  2. Check photos on their web site
  3. Check references
  4. Require an insurance certificate
  5. Proper training for employees performing work

Specialist: We live in an age of specialist.  As a rule Specialist know their topic inside and out.  When contracting a company to enter your potable water system it is better to deal with a contractor who is focused on entering potable water systems.  Companies who do nothing but service potable water systems are more likely to have equipment only used in potable water system.  Specialist in potable water work are also more likely to have disinfection procedures and a disinfection solution that meets AWWA standards.  When it is your business to do it you are just more likely to do it right.

Photos: No matter what you see on advertisements, or told on the phone, a quick check of a companie’s web site can quickly show you what their focus is on.  Many diving contractors are simply focused on Diving.  Potable water diving may just be one of the things on their long list of things they do to make money diving.  If the photos on their web sight show diving in lakes, rivers, and streams you need to trust them to somehow clean their equipment enough to enter your water system.  Like they say, a photo is worth a million words. Some contractors say they have reserved equipment they only use in potable water.  However, the photos on their own web site may show they actually use the same gear to do all diving services.  If you can find a company that specializes in potable water diving, the photos on their web site should confirm that claim, not dispute it.

References:  If a company has been working for more than a week or two, they should have references.  Ask for a list of customers that you may be allowed to contact.  Another way to check references is by looking at their company Facebook page, or the owner’s linked-in page.

Insurance:  Ask for a certificate of insurance sent from the companies insurance agent. Do not accept a certificate sent directly from the contractor. It is just too easy to change dates or fabricate the certificate from scratch.  Make sure the contractor has Liability, workers comp and commercial auto.  While they are all important, the workers comp may be the most difficult and expensive for the contractor to acquire.  Climbing and diving into potable water storage tanks and towers is “high risk contracting” by any measure.  If an accident occurs, and the contractor is not covered by his own workers compensation insurance, the customer will be liable for the injured employee.

Training:  High risk contracting may only be done safely if the contractor has required before employment, or taken the time to send each and every employee on the job site proper training.  The majority, if not all diving contractors, require that divers have diving certifications before employment is offered.  Beyond dive training, employees should also have documentation showing they have had both Confined Space and Fall Protection training.

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Photo:  Len Pardee is the Lead Tank Inspector for Ron Perrin Water Technologies.  Len has a degree in Environmental Engineering from Syracuse University. He is retired from the USEPA where he served for 34 years.  Among other posts while at the USEPA, Len was the Chief of the Region 6 Water Division for several years.

At Ron Perrin Water Technologies we take time to make sure the inspectors we send out to perform inspections have the right gear, insurance coverage and training to safely do your inspection or cleaning both efficiently and safely.  By using a state-of-the-art  under- water video camera and lighting system, we are able to collect all the information we need to produce your inspection report  while the tank remains in-service. In addition to the underwater video, our reports also feature dozens of high quality digital photos covering all AWWA inspection points.  Our innovative inspection methods have been refined by Ron Perrin since 1997 and are featured in a class he instructs for the Environmental Training Institute at UT Arlington.  Information on the course may be found at the ETI Website See WTR308 Water Tank Inspection Techniques

For more information see www.rpwt.us. For a water tank inspection or cleaning quote call Debi at 817-377-4899 or e-mail tankinspections@aol.com.