Assessment and Corrective Action required under RTCR

Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.  Lets talk about Assessment and Corrective action.

Under the RTCR, there is no longer a monthly maximum contaminant level (MCL) violation for multiple total coliform detections.  New revisions require systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system to assess the problem and take corrective action that may reduce cases of illnesses and deaths due to potential fecal contamination and waterborne pathogen exposure.   The rule says “The Distribution System”  of course, what that means is,  “The Water Utility Manager or Operator” is now required to assess the problem and take corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.

Getting started assessing the problem:

A tank inspection may be the best place to start with the assessment.  Is the vent screen in place?  Are there birds or insects in the tank?  There are at least 12 steps to a water tank inspection and at least one of them should be to get a look inside the facility to see if there is sediment on the floor of the tank.  Over time, sediment will build up on the floor area of almost all water storage tanks and towers.  One to three inches is not uncommon here in Texas. Sediment is known to be a habitat for bacteria, protozoa and viruses.  Inspection contractors can offer great documentation of the interior condition of water storage tanks with no disruption in water utility service.  Using remotely operated cameras, inspection robots, or even potable water divers, high tech contractors can deliver great information about the water storage tank or tower.  For information on in-service Water Tank and Tower Inspections, see our inspection page at www.ronperrin.com. For tips on doing your own potable water tank or tower inspection, see: Do your own potable Water Tank Inspection at:  THE TANK DIVER blog.

Corrective action may be as simple as basic housekeeping.  If you know the facility has never been cleaned there is more than a good chance sediment inside the structure needs to be removed.  Again, a qualified diving contractor can save time, water and money by removing all loose sediment with minimal water loss or disruption in service.  For more information on using a Potable Water Dive Crew to clean your potable water tank or tower see our cleaning page: www.ronperrin.com/cleaning

Our tank cleaning customers tell us time and again that their chlorine use was significantly reduced after we cleaned their facility.   With regular inspections and cleanings your likelihood of a coliform contamination are greatly reduced,  if not completely eliminated.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Sediment sample

Sediment samples

To request a tank inspection or cleaning quote, call Ron Perrin Water Technologies toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

Deadly amoeba found in a U.S. drinking water system

August 2013, the death of a 4-year-old boy staying near Violet, Louisiana, was linked to the naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a slip and slide connected to the St. Bernard Parish’s water system that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba.

More common in Australia NBC news reported that this was the first case in the U.S.

For more see: “Four year old’s Death linked to Rare Amoeba in Water System”

Keeping the city’s potable water storage tanks and towers clean may be more important now than ever!

Over time almost all tanks accumulate sediment on the floor. Any amount of sediment can become a habitat for bacteria, protozoa (like Cryptosporidium) and viruses. However, when tests show chlorine depletion, the idea of removing the sediment is usually not thought of. Additional treatment chemicals are usually the first line of defense, quickly becoming chemical warfare and potentially leaving the tank with low, or no, chlorine protection for long periods. American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that potable water storage tanks be cleaned every 3 to five years. Few states actually require tanks to be cleaned on a regular basis, and some don’t require it at all.

When a contaminant (bacteria, protozoa or viruses) enters a water storage tank and finds sediment to get a foothold in, chlorine can be quickly depleted while the contaminants grow under the protection of the sediment. Even otherwise harmless bacteria can help to deplete chlorine reserves leaving the tank vulnerable to more dangerous contaminants.

Removing sediment from the floor of potable water storage tanks greatly reduces the chance that any contaminant can get a foothold in the distribution system and grow to become a larger problem.

So why isn’t cleaning potable water storage tanks a common practice? Removing tanks from service to perform cleaning is time consuming and expensive. The smaller the water utility, the more difficult it is to find the budget for preventive maintenance.  There are many contractors that offer Potable Water Dive crews that can remove floor sediment with little or no down time and minimal water loss. Using a qualified potable water dive crew to clean water storage tanks can save the water utility time and water.

Keeping potable water storage tanks free of accumulated sediment is essential for the health of the system and the health of your customers. If you administer a drinking water system, make a plan to schedule cleanings and stick to it.

References:

For more information on Potable Water Divers see:  www.ronperrin.com

For more information on Naegleria fowleri amoeba in drinking water see:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/public-water-systems.html

NOTE: You cannot be infected with Naegleria fowleri by drinking contaminated water. In very rare instances, Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or contaminated tap water) enters the nose. (For example: when people submerge their heads or cleanse their noses during religious practices, and when people irrigate their sinuses (nose) using contaminated tap water.)

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 

Cryptosporidium Drinking Water Health Advisory  EPA  March 2001

DEEP TREKKER ROV – Test Run June 2013

We recently Purchased a DEEP TREKKER ROV to use inspecting potable water storage tanks and towers.
This video shows our first “Test Flight” in a clearwell and the second inspection we did on a ground storage tank. We added a safety rope to protect the tether and found the lighting system caused a little bit of glare when we went into darker parts of the tank, but it was reduced when we got closer to the inspection points we needed to look at. Overall, we found it to be a very good inspection tool!

To learn more about what may be in potable water tanks and towers visit:

“THE CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT”

For more information on RON PERRIN WATER TECHNOLOGIES click here or visit www.ronperrin.com

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I have over 600 professional contacts, come join my professional network. Find me:   Search: “Ron Perrin Water Technologies” on the main Linked in page or google “Ron Perrin Water Technologies on Linked in”.  

Do you need a Potable water tank or tower inspected?

Our inspection methods offer the most information for the least cost,  all of our inspection methods include an underwater DVD allowing you to see what is in your storage tanks.  Remote video camera, ROV or potable water diver we have a method for every budget.

Call us toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

Recent Water Tower Cleaning had a few surprises

Sediment Samples from tower cleaning

Potable water tower

Sediment Being Removed from the interior floor of tower

Sediment Being Removed from the interior floor of tower

We recently cleaned a potable water storage tower that had not been cleaned since it was built in the mid 1980’s.  This facility was in compliance, it had been inspected once a year, but due to the fact that there are no set rules on when to clean water storage tanks in Texas it had never been cleaned.

Sediment sample

Sediment sample

We used a Celestron LED digital microscope to take a close look at the sediment removed from the floor of the tank.  I posted what we found on my blog titled: THE CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT at www.ronperrin.us.  Due to the fact that rules on inspecting and cleaning potable water storage facilities vary greatly from state to state we may soon see changes in this area of Federal Regulation.

Currently most states do not have specific rules on when potable water storage tanks should be cleaned.

Please visit my CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT blog and take the poll a few post down from the top.  I would like feedback if you think the EPA should make a standardized requirement of cleaning and inspection of the nations drinking water tanks and towers.

If you are on LINKED IN please Join my network HERE.

THE BOOK

THE BOOK

DO YOU NEED YOUR WATER STORAGE TANK OR TOWER Inspected or CLEANED?  Call 888-481-1768

ARE YOU HAVING TROUBLE GETTING THE FUNDS YOU NEED to Inspect or clean your water storage tank?
YOU NEED MY BOOK! Show your Director, or Manager what sediment looks like that builds up in water tanks over time!

CHAPTER FOUR covers Contaminates In our Water!

CHAPTER SEVEN covers Inspection Methods.

CHAPTER EIGHT covers Cleaning Methods with color photos of sediment being removed!

CLICK HERE To Order: Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage by Ron Perrin

Tank and Tower cleaning Service

Our Potable Water Divers are able to inspect or clean water storage tanks and towers with no disruption in service and minimal water loss.  Our equipment is purchased for and only used in potable water.  Our divers are Commercially certified through training approved by the Association of Diving Contractors.      Call toll free 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Underwater Services offered to U.S. Water Systems

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in potable water tank & tower inspection. We offer 3 different water tank & tower inspections. All of these inspections provide digital photos of inspection points and problem areas along with an underwater DVD so you can see the interior roof and floor of your water storage tank with no water loss or disruption in service. We take pride in offering you the most information for the least cost. 

Our potable water dive team is available to clean sediment from the floor of your water storage tanks, set plugs, and offer other underwater services.

Field Tech Inspecting a water tower

Field Tech Inspecting a water tower

Other than underwater inspections with a remote camera, cleaning of potable water storage tanks is our most popular Underwater Service.Diver enters water tower.

Water Storage Tank Cleaning VideoSince 1997, we have worked for over 500 water utilities in over 8 U.S. states and Internationally in Mexico.

To date our International underwater services has only been to inspect fire protection systems for American corporations with plants in Mexico.We are looking forward to offering more international diving services in the future.-Visit our web page at www.ronperrin.com

Have your potable water storage tanks been cleaned lately ?

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Potable Water Tank cleaning

Photo: Sediment being removed from Potable Water Storage Tank.

*       The American Water Works Association recommends that tanks be cleaned at least every three years.  Recent focus on pharmaceuticals in water systems have made more people than ever aware of contaminates that may be lurking in their water supply.   Although pharmaceuticals in drinking water may be in the news the real threat is random bacteria and cryptosporidium spores.

The Threat of Bacteria-

Countless kinds of bacteria can make their way into a public water supply.  Chlorine and other treatment methods are our first line of defense.  When potable water storage tanks are clean small amounts of bacteria that survive the treatment process cycle through the system undetected and harmless due to the small quantity.  Sediment in the tank can capture and harbor these small amounts of bacteria.  The bacteria can start to grow hidden from chlorine deep in the sediment.  Chlorine can even be overwhelmed and depleted if a nitrate eating bacteria is collected.   As the bacteria continues to grow in the sediment month after month and year after year the threat to public health grows.       

  The Threat of Cryptosporidium

The threat of cryptosporidium outbreak is even greater with sediment in the floor of a water storage tank.   Again Sediment can harbor bacteria, cryptosporidium and other contaminates.  The best defense to insure a protozoa like  cryptosporidium will not take up residence in your water storage system may be to keep the tanks free of sediment.  In the Spring of 1993 over 100 people died as a result of a cryptosporidium outbreak that was directly associated with the Howard Avenue Water Purification Plant.  This was the largest water born disease ever documented in United States history.  It is estimated that over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea.  

Due to the fact that cryptosporidium is a protozoa parasite with a thick outer shell it is highly resistant to disinfectants such as chlorine.  The best defense to ensure it will not inhabit your water system may be to make sure your water tanks remain sediment free.  This will remove and habitat that small amounts bacteria or protozoa could lodge and grow in, Preventing possible public health problem in the most simple way.  Keeping water storage tanks clean.    

Sediment being removed

Photo: Sediment being removed from Potable Water Storage Tank.

What is in the floor of your tank Call RON PERRIN to find out 1-888-481-1768

See www.ronperrin.com  for more details.