Top Ten Reasons to clean your potable water storage tanks in 2021

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow GiardiaLegionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tank and tower cleaning rates are affordable and we have special pricing for tiny tanks under 10,000 gallons.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

Check out our new video series on YouTube. Tap-Talk explores our water distribution systems as we take you along and let you see what we see as we inspect and clean municipal water storage tanks. Our cameras let you see what is inside, we never reveal the utility we are working for or our exact location unless our customer gives us permission. Episode #1 is posted below, less than six minutes, I explain what we do and how we do it, talk about my background and what led me to start my company in 1997.

Episode Two:

There is a serious danger lurking in many water systems. Join me, along with microbiologists and a former EPA drinking water chief as they discuss the problem. If you like this video please give us a thumbs up and SHARE it! It is important that water utility managers understand the importance of keeping water storage tanks clean. PLEASE SHARE!

Episode Three:

Wallie is a Deep Trekker DT640VAC robot crawler we use to clean water storage tanks that have deep water. The Deep Trekker DT640 robot crawler can work it water up to 165 feet deep. To see more check out our blog at http://www.tankdiver.us. To contact our office please call 817-377-4899 or contact Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com

Want More? This video is a 15 minute look back at some of the jobs we have done over the past three years.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899 or

e-mail Robert Perrin at perrinsales@gmail.com

Our Best Photo of 2020

Since 1997 we have been inspecting and cleaning potable water storage tanks and towers. Our crews take hundreds and often over a thousand photos a week. Of course, most are a little on the boring side documenting the inspection points of water tanks and towers. Occasionally we turn the cameras on ourselves as we do the work and those are the photos I use to promote our service.

Every time I see this photo I think about how it nails down what we do. I think it was the best of 2020. It is one of our divers cleaning a GST potable water storage facility. The tanks are always a lot cleaner when we are done, about half way through you can see a lot of sediment on the floor and less that perfectly clear water, it is a real working photo, not something produced in perfect pool water conditions.

Here are some other photos I found to be impressive in 2020 I hope you like them too.

Our Favorite ROBOT Tank Cleaning Photos!

Water Tank Inspection. Water Tank Cleaning.

KEEPING DRINKING WATER SAFE

Our goal is to get people thinking about their water, and allow utility officials to understand the choices they have when it comes to inspecting and cleaning potable water storage tanks and towers. 

For more information about our inspection or cleaning services See: www.watertankinspection.com

Be sure to subscribe to our new video series Tap Talk at: www.taptalk.blog

Like our FaceBook page at: https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

Contact Information: Phone 817-377-4899 E-mail perrinsales@gmail.com

Meet Wallie Our Standpipe Cleaning Robot

“Wallie” is our DT640 VAC Deep Trekker Crawler Robot that we have purchased to clean standpipes. Standpipes typically have deeper water than other potable water storage tanks, with water depth often over 100 feet. Wallie can operate safely in water up to 168 feet deep. This will be a big asset to water utilities that do not want to take their standpipe out of service to remove the sediment from the floor of the tank.

It is important to keep potable water storage tanks and towers clean. Sediment builds up over time. A layer of sediment in your water storage tank or tower may allow bacteria, protozoa, viruses or other organisms to get a foothold in your water storage tank, grow, and become a community health problem.

Keeping your tank clean will also save you money! Our customers report that they use less chlorine to meet water quality standards after we clean their storage facility.

Since 1997, Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in underwater inspections and tank cleanings. We offer a wider range of inspection and cleaning choices depending on your needs. Our underwater inspections may be performed with a Remote Underwater Video Camera, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), or for the most detail, we also offer a Diver Inspection. We have a Small Tank Cleaning Service for tanks from 1,000 to 10,000 gallons, Robot Cleaning for Standpipes and our Potable Water Dive Crew is a good fit for most other facilities. Call today for a free quote: 1-888-481-1768.

(c) Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. 2020 www.ronperrin.us

Water Tower Inspection and Cleaning

IMG_20200430_133707_025.jpg

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers.

Water Tower cleaning.

Sediment removal from water tower.

We serve municipal water utilities, federal parks and prisons and private industry. We deploy underwater cameras or remotely operated vehicles to perform inspections of drinking water tanks.

Our methods save our customers millions of gallons of treated drinking water every year.  If the facility needs to be cleaned our potable water dive team can remove tank sediment with minimal water loss and little to no disruption in service.

Sediment on the interior floor of a water storage tank is a breach and can be a serious threat to pubic health. Bacteria, protozoa and even viruses have been found to use tank sediment as a safe habitat.

Keeping your tanks clean will help keep your water system safe.  Are your tanks and towers on a cleaning schedule?  We want to help you keep your water tanks and towers clean and healthy! Do not allow dirt that builds up on the floor of your potable water storage tanks to be a safe habitat to grow Giardia, Legionella or viruses like Norovirus.  Our water tower cleaning rates start at only $2,450.00. Affordable protection for your water storage tanks affordable safety for the people you serve.

Call today for a free quote 817-377-4899.

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list these as the top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

Do you still need a reason to clean your water storage tanks

Sediment on the floor of your water storage tank is a Breach in your system. The more sediment you have in your water storage tanks the bigger your risk for having a water-related contaminant issue. Tank sediment builds up over time and can provide a wide range of contaminants including viruses a way to get a foothold in your water system. The tank sediment can provide a safe habitat allowing a small number of bacteria or viruses to quickly grow into the billions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released a guidance and fact sheet on transmission of the novel coronavirus in water.

THE GOOD: The agency stated: “Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.”

THE BAD: The fact is other viruses are found in drinking water, in fact you will find them in the top ten contaminants. Including Hepatitis A, a vaccine-preventable, communicable disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), and Norovirus. A very contagious virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea. Conventional water treatment methods should also prevent these viruses from contaminating drinking water systems but they remain in the top ten of drinking water-related contaminants.

Here is the top ten list of Water-related Diseases and Contaminants the CDC found in in Public Water Systems.

The United States has one of the safest public drinking water supplies in the world. Over 286 million Americans get their tap water from a community water system (1). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates drinking water quality in public water systems and sets maximum concentration levels for water chemicals and pollutants.

Sources of drinking water are subject to contamination and require appropriate treatment to remove disease-causing contaminants. Contamination of drinking water supplies can occur in the source water as well as in the distribution system after water treatment has already occurred. There are many sources of water contamination, including naturally occurring chemicals and minerals (for example, arsenic, radon, uranium), local land use practices (fertilizers, pesticides, concentrated feeding operations), manufacturing processes, and sewer overflows or wastewater releases.

The presence of contaminants in water can lead to adverse health effects, including gastrointestinal illness, reproductive problems, and neurological disorders. Infants, young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people whose immune systems are compromised because of AIDS, chemotherapy, or transplant medications, may be especially susceptible to illness from some contaminants.

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*
Giardia
Legionella
Norovirus
Shigella
Campylobacter
Copper
Salmonella
Hepatitis A
Cryptosporidium
E. coli, excess fluoride (tie)

——————————
Source: CDC https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html

Water Tank Inspection – Shopping for a Potable Water Tank Inspector? Think about This-

Here are a few things to consider when shopping for a contractor to perform work in a potable water storage tank.

  1. Look for a specialist
  2. Check photos on their web site
  3. Check references
  4. Require an insurance certificate
  5. Proper training for employees performing work

Specialist: We live in an age of specialist.  As a rule Specialist know their topic inside and out.  When contracting a company to enter your potable water system it is better to deal with a contractor who is focused on entering potable water systems.  Companies who do nothing but service potable water systems are more likely to have equipment only used in potable water system.  Specialist in potable water work are also more likely to have disinfection procedures and a disinfection solution that meets AWWA standards.  When it is your business to do it you are just more likely to do it right.

Photos: No matter what you see on advertisements, or told on the phone, a quick check of a companie’s web site can quickly show you what their focus is on.  Many diving contractors are simply focused on Diving.  Potable water diving may just be one of the things on their long list of things they do to make money diving.  If the photos on their web sight show diving in lakes, rivers, and streams you need to trust them to somehow clean their equipment enough to enter your water system.  Like they say, a photo is worth a million words. Some contractors say they have reserved equipment they only use in potable water.  However, the photos on their own web site may show they actually use the same gear to do all diving services.  If you can find a company that specializes in potable water diving, the photos on their web site should confirm that claim, not dispute it.

References:  If a company has been working for more than a week or two, they should have references.  Ask for a list of customers that you may be allowed to contact.  Another way to check references is by looking at their company Facebook page, or the owner’s linked-in page.

Insurance:  Ask for a certificate of insurance sent from the companies insurance agent. Do not accept a certificate sent directly from the contractor. It is just too easy to change dates or fabricate the certificate from scratch.  Make sure the contractor has Liability, workers comp and commercial auto.  While they are all important, the workers comp may be the most difficult and expensive for the contractor to acquire.  Climbing and diving into potable water storage tanks and towers is “high risk contracting” by any measure.  If an accident occurs, and the contractor is not covered by his own workers compensation insurance, the customer will be liable for the injured employee.

Training:  High risk contracting may only be done safely if the contractor has required before employment, or taken the time to send each and every employee on the job site proper training.  The majority, if not all diving contractors, require that divers have diving certifications before employment is offered.  Beyond dive training, employees should also have documentation showing they have had both Confined Space and Fall Protection training.

20180207_111442

Photo:  Len Pardee is the Lead Tank Inspector for Ron Perrin Water Technologies.  Len has a degree in Environmental Engineering from Syracuse University. He is retired from the USEPA where he served for 34 years.  Among other posts while at the USEPA, Len was the Chief of the Region 6 Water Division for several years.

At Ron Perrin Water Technologies we take time to make sure the inspectors we send out to perform inspections have the right gear, insurance coverage and training to safely do your inspection or cleaning both efficiently and safely.  By using a state-of-the-art  under- water video camera and lighting system, we are able to collect all the information we need to produce your inspection report  while the tank remains in-service. In addition to the underwater video, our reports also feature dozens of high quality digital photos covering all AWWA inspection points.  Our innovative inspection methods have been refined by Ron Perrin since 1997 and are featured in a class he instructs for the Environmental Training Institute at UT Arlington.  Information on the course may be found at the ETI Website See WTR308 Water Tank Inspection Techniques

For more information see www.rpwt.us. For a water tank inspection or cleaning quote call Debi at 817-377-4899 or e-mail tankinspections@aol.com.

 

Got UGLY TANK?

Concrete Tank Cleaning. We now offer pressure washing service for ground tanks. Please give us a call for a free quote.
817-377-4899.

 

High Pressure Wash with Certified Lift Operator
After Wash

Check out our April Newsletter

 

Check out our April 2017 Newsletter:  CLICK HERE
We inspect your facilities with no water loss or
 disruption in service!
Stop by our booth and see our Underwater Inspection
video that saves time, water and money!

We want to be your contracted inspection service!
Call today for free quote 888-481-1786
Our underwater cameras provide the best documentation 
with the lowest cost
and NO DISRUPTION IN SERVICE

Check out our April 2017 Newsletter:  CLICK HERE

On the NEWS with i-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.  

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.

This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

Sediment being removed

Sediment being removed

Safe tap water is something everyone should have.

Crew Prepares for Dive

Crew Prepares for Dive

                                          Click Here to see:    CBS DFW_ VIDEO

 

NEWSsinc.com VIDEO

     SEE THE FULL STORY HERE: 

CBS 11 DFW NEWS STORY  http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

This story aired on 

Thanks for taking the time to check this out.

Photos taken by

RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan

Find us on FACEBOOK  or connect with Ron on Linked-In

Visit my You Tube Channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/RonPerrin for more great videos like these:

We offer potable water tank inspections and cleaning.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry providing state-of-the-art inspections with remote underwater cameras.  Our inspection reports are the best in the industry, covering all state requirements for water tank and tower inspection and meeting all AWWA guidelines.  Our inspections cover over 30 inspection points.  Digital photography documents the condition of your tank, and our narrated underwater video lets you see first-hand what the inside roof walls and floor areas of the tank look like.

.

For those experiencing an EPA total coliform violation, our underwater inspections are a perfect place to start assessing your problem. Should accumulated sediment be found in the tank, our potable water dive crew can offer a cleaning solution that may be the only step needed to satisfy the Revised Total Coliform Rule requirement to take action.  Accumulated tank sediment can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and other contaminants.  Removing the sediment is often the only step required to comply with the Revised Total Coliform Rule**, in fact, our customers tell us time after time that their chlorine costs were significantly reduced after the tank was cleaned.

.

Diving in potable water is an art.  Unlike offshore divers, potable water divers must be able to enter the water system without disrupting sediment on the floor of the tanks.  Our divers are sealed in a dry suit so no part of their body touches the water.  They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet AWWA and state standards.  The diver is then free to go into the confined space inside the water storage tanks. Underwater, the diver can do a more detailed inspection, or clean the loose sediment from the floor of the tank.

.

We are here to help you get it done!  We offer the most choices for your inspection needs:

*Remote underwater camera (drop camera)

*ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle (specially designed and only used in potable water)

*Diver inspection – For the most detail

*Basic state requirements covered with, or without, photos to meet budget needs

.

We have served over 500 water utilities since 1997.  Our customers include municipalities, prisons, universities and military bases.  They all have one thing in common – they wanted comprehensive documentation about the status of their water tank, with no water loss and no disruption in service.

.

For more information about in-service tank inspections and cleaning, please see our primary web site at: www.ronperrin.com .

Or call 888-481-1768 for a free no obligation quote.

.

**On February 13, 2013, EPA published in the Federal Register the revisions to the 1989 TCR.  EPA anticipates greater public   health protection under the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requirements.  The RTCR:

  • Requires public water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems; and
  • Establishes criteria for systems to qualify for and stay on reduced monitoring, which could reduce water system burden and provide incentives for better system operation.
  • Click here for more information about the RTCR.