Inspection Contractor for 30 years!

I have been a Water Tank Inspection Contractor for over 30 years. Starting in 1991, my first inspections were done on my days off while still working as a full-time Texas Peace Officer. I was a principal at Tank Diver Inspections (TDI) a startup company that failed. Form 1994 to 96 I was director of marketing at U.S. Underwater Services in 96 I was promoted to Director of Operations. In 1997 I established Ron Perrin Water Technologies and devoted myself to developing the best methods to inspect and clean potable water storage tanks with NO DISRUPTION in water service. We incorporated in 2020. We offer the best inspection in the industry. We are here to serve you! We offer three different water storage tanks inspections, all include underwater documentation with our underwater video cameras and lighting systems.


Our Company
 provides nondisruptive water tank inspections on potable water storage tanks in Texas and 14 other states. In Texas, our tank inspections meet all requirements found under Texas Administrative code 290.46 (m)(1) -Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.  We want to be your Contracted Inspection Service.

In Texas you must examine your ground, elevated, and pressure storage tanks at least once every year to make sure they are in good working condition. Tanks should be inspected no later than one year after the last time you checked them.

Ground and elevated tanks are required to be inspected inside and out every year. Pressure tanks also need to be inspected on the outside every year and if they have an inspection port they are required to have the interior inspected once every five years. The grounds and facilities shall be maintained in a manner so as to minimize the possibility of the harboring of rodents, insects, and other disease vectors, and in such a way as to prevent other conditions that might cause the contamination of the water.  (1) Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.    (A) Ground and elevated storage tank inspections must determine that the vents are in place and properly screened, the roof hatches closed and locked, flap valves and gaskets provide adequate protection against insects, rodents, and other vermin, the interior and exterior coating systems are continuing to provide adequate protection to all metal surfaces, and the tank remains in a watertight condition.  

It is extremely important these facilities be properly inspected, we recently inspected a ground storage tank that had a damaged vent screen, inside on the floor of the tank we found two dead rats. Not what you want in a water tank that you are drinking out of. Birds and insects are much more common, it there is a hole in the vent screen that you can put your finger in you can bet there are insects in the tank. It the hole is big enough to put your fist in there is a good chance you will find a dead bird. On a hot day, the animals can smell the water if there is a way for them to get it they will. Like a big lobster trap they can get in but they can’t get out. Let’s take a look at your tanks!

We have several inspections to choose from:

  • Remote Underwater Video – This is is our most popular and economical inspection. We document all State required inspection points. Our report is delivered in a notebook with photographs of inspection points and an underwater video that covers the interior roof, water surface, waterline and underwater areas visible from our remote underwater camera and lighting system.
  • Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV)- Covers everything above with additional underwater video taken from one of our ROV’s. This allows you to get a more detailed inspection for much larger facilities. It also allows a customer to get great documentation on specific areas if needed.
  • Diver Inspection– Our potable water dive crew is usually reserved to clean water storage tanks and towers. The divers are sealed in their own environment using a DRY SUIT. No part of the divers body touches the water in addition, to meet state and federal requirements divers are washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution. Divers are able to get an even more detailed inspection.
  • Tank Cleaning and Inspection– All of our inspections include an underwater video of tank floors. This allows us to get a good estimate of accumulated sediment. It is important to know how much sediment is in the tank. Sediment on the floor of the tank that can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses. Our cleaning service removes all loose sediment. After the sediment is removed we are able to see the floor of the tank allowing us to document the condition of the paint and see corroded areas if any. When is the last time your tanks were cleaned?

If you are task with inspecting your own tank we can help with that too. I teach a course at the Environmental Training Institute (ETI) located at the UT Arlington Division for Enterprise Development. The class is 16 hours over two days and has class dates scheduled in 2021 and 2022.

WTR 308 Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques

Course NameMeetsBeginsEndsFee
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesW&Th 8:30 A–5:30 P09/29/2109/30/21650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh&F 8:30 AM–5:30 P08/18/2208/19/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques (Online)Th& F 8:30 A–5:30 P04/14/2204/15/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh& F 8:30 A–5:30 P12/08/2212/09/22650.00

If you cant make the class I also offer a review of what you need to look at online see:

www.watertankinspecton.co – A DIY Guide to Inspecting Potable Water Storage Tanks.

Last in Texas you will need to maintain a Water Tank Inspection Log

PWS Water Tank Inspection Log – Texas.gov

If we may be of service please contact us.

For a free quote for inspection or cleaning e-mail Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com or call 817-377-4899.

For more info see; www.ronperrin.com or or blog www.tankdiver.us.

Diving into Drinking Water

We had another great day Diving.

Our thing is to inspect and clean potable water tanks (Drinking Water). We use underwater cameras to make quick work out of tank and tower inspections. If the tank has sediment in the interior floor our potable water dive crew suits up in a dry suit and commercial dive hat so no part of the diver’s body touches the water supply. They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet EPA standards for diving into potable water.

Over time sediment builds up in most water storage tanks, sediment may be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, and even viruses. Keeping tanks clean and free of sediment is one of the most effective ways to keep water safe to drink. If your system would like a free quote give us a call at 817-377-4899.

NEW VIDEO PODCAST Series – TAP TALK, WHAT IS IN YOUR DRINKING WATER?

In our new video series Tap-Talk where we discuss what is really in your water system. For years we have been working on a feature-length documentary film. Our working title is “Out of Sight- Out of Mind, what’s in your water?” This video POD series will tap into some of the things that we found along the way as we continue to put this important film together. We will take you into public water systems like no one else has, as we inspect and clean municipal water tanks and towers with remote underwater cameras and commercially trained divers. This video is the introduction.

For a free water tank inspection or cleaning quote call toll free 1-888-481-1768 or e-mail Robert Perrin at perrinsales@gmail.com.

Water Tank Cleaning – Water Tank Inspection

Water Tank Inspection. Water Tank Cleaning.

KEEPING DRINKING WATER SAFE

Our goal is to get people thinking about their water, and allow utility officials to understand the choices they have when it comes to inspecting and cleaning potable water storage tanks and towers.  

Potable Water Tank Inspection

We offer three types of water tank inspections.

1). No-Entry remote camera inspections.  Our custom made underwater cameras allow you to see what is going on inside your water system.  The underwater camera allows you to see if you have corrosion under the water line with no disruption to your water service.  The camera can go to the floor of the tank allowing the inspector to check for sediment and record what he discovers.

2). Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV).  Our ROV inspection is recommended of water storage tanks and towers over one million gallons.  In addition to the basic camera inspections the ROV can travel to the rear of the larger facilities to get a better look at tank conditions including corrosion and sediment levels.

3). Diver Inspection. Our potable water dive crew offers our highest level of inspection. This is recommended when accurate sediment levels need to be measured or specific area is needed to be checked.  Potable water dives are also a great way to make minor leak or repairs to target float cables.

Potable Water Tank Cleaning

If the inspection confirms sediment on the floor of the tank our dive crew can make quick work out of cleaning it.

Sediment provides an environment for bacteria, protozoa and viruses to thrive, and it depletes chlorine reserves. Removing the sediment reduces the need for continual increases of chlorine, and enables you to deliver the cleanest, healthiest water possible to your customers.

     We provide an after-cleaning video to let you see that there is no sediment left in your tank when we are finished cleaning it. We clean your tank while it is in-service, saving you time and money.

     Additional savings can be realized when your chlorine usage drops because you are no longer trying to fight the microbes that were removed during the cleaning process.

For more information on water tank and tower cleaning visit: https://www.watertankinspection.com/tank-cleaning

For more information on inspecting Texas water tanks see: www.texaswatertankinspection.com

For a list of potable water tank inspection requirements see our article on DIY Water Tank Inspections  .

In Texas the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s (TCEQ) Rules and Regulations for Public Water Systems requires documentation of annual ground, elevated, and pressure storage tank maintenance inspections.

For a TCEQ Tank Inspection LOG Click HERE.

For a free quote please call 817-377-4899 Fill out the form on the side of the page or          e-mail: tankinspections@aol.com

Our professional dive crew can be a valuable part of your tank maintenance program.

IMG_20200422_125907
Keeping your tank clean removes the habitat that bacteria, protozoa and even viruses can use to get a foothold in your water system.
What is the top reason to clean your tank?
Microorganisms
Microorganisms can use the sediment that builds up on the floor of almost all potable water storage tanks and towers to get a foothold in the water system. Hidden from treatment chemicals under the protection of the sediment these contaminants can grow until they deplete chlorine reserves and become a public health problem.
Microorganisms causing waterborne diseases include protozoa and bacteria, many of which are intestinal parasites, or invade the tissues or circulatory system through walls of the digestive tract. Various other waterborne diseases are caused by viruses. (In spite of philosophical difficulties associated with defining viruses as “organisms”, it is practical and convenient to regard them as microorganisms in this context.)
Removing the sediment removes the habitat that allows these microbes to remain hidden in your water system and thrive.
I found a great article on contaminants found in potable water check this out.

We are here when you need us!

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry.  We use remotely operated underwater video cameras to get the most information for the lowest possible cost. We are able to inspect your tanks inside and out with no water loss or disruption in service.

Diver.Entry.March.2020 copy

If your water tank or tower needs to be cleaned our potable water dive crew can remove all loose sediment from the floor of the facility with minimal water loss. Give us a call at 817-377-4899 for a free quote. Check out and like our Facebook page facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

Do you still need a reason to clean your water storage tanks

Sediment on the floor of your water storage tank is a Breach in your system. The more sediment you have in your water storage tanks the bigger your risk for having a water-related contaminant issue. Tank sediment builds up over time and can provide a wide range of contaminants including viruses a way to get a foothold in your water system. The tank sediment can provide a safe habitat allowing a small number of bacteria or viruses to quickly grow into the billions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released a guidance and fact sheet on transmission of the novel coronavirus in water.

THE GOOD: The agency stated: “Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.”

THE BAD: The fact is other viruses are found in drinking water, in fact you will find them in the top ten contaminants. Including Hepatitis A, a vaccine-preventable, communicable disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), and Norovirus. A very contagious virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea. Conventional water treatment methods should also prevent these viruses from contaminating drinking water systems but they remain in the top ten of drinking water-related contaminants.

Here is the top ten list of Water-related Diseases and Contaminants the CDC found in in Public Water Systems.

The United States has one of the safest public drinking water supplies in the world. Over 286 million Americans get their tap water from a community water system (1). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates drinking water quality in public water systems and sets maximum concentration levels for water chemicals and pollutants.

Sources of drinking water are subject to contamination and require appropriate treatment to remove disease-causing contaminants. Contamination of drinking water supplies can occur in the source water as well as in the distribution system after water treatment has already occurred. There are many sources of water contamination, including naturally occurring chemicals and minerals (for example, arsenic, radon, uranium), local land use practices (fertilizers, pesticides, concentrated feeding operations), manufacturing processes, and sewer overflows or wastewater releases.

The presence of contaminants in water can lead to adverse health effects, including gastrointestinal illness, reproductive problems, and neurological disorders. Infants, young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people whose immune systems are compromised because of AIDS, chemotherapy, or transplant medications, may be especially susceptible to illness from some contaminants.

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*
Giardia
Legionella
Norovirus
Shigella
Campylobacter
Copper
Salmonella
Hepatitis A
Cryptosporidium
E. coli, excess fluoride (tie)

——————————
Source: CDC https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/water_diseases.html

Why Isn’t ChlorineTreatment Enough?

I had some water utility workers ask me, “Why isn’t chlorine treatment of potable water enough to keep water safe? Why should we worry about cleaning tanks when we already use chlorine?”

Chlorine works great as long as there is not a breach in the tank. When there is a breach like a hole in the top that lets birds and insects inside the tank, the chlorine can not keep up. This is why annual tank inspections are so important. People have died from this scenario, see: “Salmonella Outbreak in Alamosa, Colorado“. According to USEPA officials a sediment build up on the interior floor of a water storage tank is another type of breach. Bacteria like Legionella, protozoa like Cryptosporidium, and a wide range of viruses including Norovirus can hide and GROW in the tank sediment.

Do you know what the #1 cause of municipal water contamination is? According to the CDC it is a microscopic parasite called Giardia. The sediment becomes a perfect habitat providing both shelter and food for Giardia and many other microorganisms to grow. In time, the contaminants can reach a point where they overwhelm chlorine or any other disinfectant you may be using. Keeping tanks clean keeps your drinking water safe.

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Giardia- Photo CDC website

Top 10 Causes – Outbreaks in Public Water Systems*

For a complete listing of water-related surveillance data, see CDC’s Surveillance Reports for Drinking Water-associated Disease & Outbreaks.

A professional potable water Dive Crew can remove tank sediment along with everything that is growing in it with minimal water loss.  The diver is sealed in a DRY suit so there is no human contact with the water supply.  He can then enter the tank and make quick work of removing tank sediment and any contaminant that may be hiding in it.  Give us a call toll free at 1-888-481-1768 for a free quote.

For more information on Municipal Water Tank Cleaning see: Ron Perrin Water Technologies web Site: www.rpwt.us.

Content source: Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Cleaning Water Storage is Important

This Is Why We Clean Tanks.

Top 10 Causes of Contamination Outbreaks in Public Water Systems according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

  • Giardia
  • Legionella
  • Norovirus
  • Shigella
  • Campylobacter
  • Copper
  • Salmonella
  • Hepatitis
  • Cryptosporidium
  • E. coli, excess fluoride (tie)

Bacteria, protozoa, invertebrates and viruses all love heat. The last few years we have continued to see record-breaking heat waves again and again. Keeping water distribution tanks clean should become more of a priority. Several of the top ten water system contaminants listed by the CDC can use the soft sediment that builds up on the floor of water storage tanks as a habitat to grow and become a public health problem. Removing sediment removes the habitat that contaminants can use for food and shelter allowing rapid growth. Keep your tanks clean with potable water diving services from Ron Perrin Water Technologies call 817-377-4899.

Out-of-sight and out-of-mind, sediment in a water storage tank can hide a wide range of contaminants. Keeping the tanks clean will help you maintain a safe water system and meet water quality standards.  Take a quick look at what we keep out of your water storage tank by removing accumulated sediment. All potable water storage tanks should be on a cleaning schedule, is yours?  You do not want to drink these guys! www.rpwt.us

giardia-bannerGiardia – Photo CDC Website

Cryptosporidium                                                                        Cryptosporidium

 

Legenella CDC-illustration.jpgLegionella – Illustration from CDC website.

Give us a call at 817-377-4899 for in-service water tank inspection or cleaning services.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies – see more at our web site: www.rpwt.us 

 

 

Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

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Sediment being removed from the floor of a potable water storage tank by a dive crew.

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system.   Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC:  “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Click Here to see the map:  NUMBER OF CASE-REPORTS OF PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS CAUSED BY NAEGLERIA FOWLERI

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

 

Ron Perrin

         Ron Perrin

Ron Perrin is the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over six thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at www.ronperrin.com.

Debi Wheelan Office Manager

Debi Wheelan

For a free proposal to clean and inspect your potable water storage tanks and towers please call Debi at 817-377-4899.

or e-mail  tankinspections@aol.com