Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

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Sediment being removed from the floor of a potable water storage tank by a dive crew.

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system.   Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC:  “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Click Here to see the map:  NUMBER OF CASE-REPORTS OF PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS CAUSED BY NAEGLERIA FOWLERI

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

 

Ron Perrin

         Ron Perrin

Ron Perrin is the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over six thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at www.ronperrin.com.

Debi Wheelan Office Manager

Debi Wheelan

For a free proposal to clean and inspect your potable water storage tanks and towers please call Debi at 817-377-4899.

or e-mail  tankinspections@aol.com

 

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We offer potable water tank inspections and cleaning.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry providing state-of-the-art inspections with remote underwater cameras.  Our inspection reports are the best in the industry, covering all state requirements for water tank and tower inspection and meeting all AWWA guidelines.  Our inspections cover over 30 inspection points.  Digital photography documents the condition of your tank, and our narrated underwater video lets you see first-hand what the inside roof walls and floor areas of the tank look like.

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For those experiencing an EPA total coliform violation, our underwater inspections are a perfect place to start assessing your problem. Should accumulated sediment be found in the tank, our potable water dive crew can offer a cleaning solution that may be the only step needed to satisfy the Revised Total Coliform Rule requirement to take action.  Accumulated tank sediment can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and other contaminants.  Removing the sediment is often the only step required to comply with the Revised Total Coliform Rule**, in fact, our customers tell us time after time that their chlorine costs were significantly reduced after the tank was cleaned.

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Diving in potable water is an art.  Unlike offshore divers, potable water divers must be able to enter the water system without disrupting sediment on the floor of the tanks.  Our divers are sealed in a dry suit so no part of their body touches the water.  They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet AWWA and state standards.  The diver is then free to go into the confined space inside the water storage tanks. Underwater, the diver can do a more detailed inspection, or clean the loose sediment from the floor of the tank.

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We are here to help you get it done!  We offer the most choices for your inspection needs:

*Remote underwater camera (drop camera)

*ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle (specially designed and only used in potable water)

*Diver inspection – For the most detail

*Basic state requirements covered with, or without, photos to meet budget needs

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We have served over 500 water utilities since 1997.  Our customers include municipalities, prisons, universities and military bases.  They all have one thing in common – they wanted comprehensive documentation about the status of their water tank, with no water loss and no disruption in service.

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For more information about in-service tank inspections and cleaning, please see our primary web site at: www.ronperrin.com .

Or call 888-481-1768 for a free no obligation quote.

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**On February 13, 2013, EPA published in the Federal Register the revisions to the 1989 TCR.  EPA anticipates greater public   health protection under the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requirements.  The RTCR:

  • Requires public water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems; and
  • Establishes criteria for systems to qualify for and stay on reduced monitoring, which could reduce water system burden and provide incentives for better system operation.
  • Click here for more information about the RTCR.

DEEP TREKKER ROV – Test Run June 2013

We recently Purchased a DEEP TREKKER ROV to use inspecting potable water storage tanks and towers.
This video shows our first “Test Flight” in a clearwell and the second inspection we did on a ground storage tank. We added a safety rope to protect the tether and found the lighting system caused a little bit of glare when we went into darker parts of the tank, but it was reduced when we got closer to the inspection points we needed to look at. Overall, we found it to be a very good inspection tool!

To learn more about what may be in potable water tanks and towers visit:

“THE CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT”

For more information on RON PERRIN WATER TECHNOLOGIES click here or visit www.ronperrin.com

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Do you need a Potable water tank or tower inspected?

Our inspection methods offer the most information for the least cost,  all of our inspection methods include an underwater DVD allowing you to see what is in your storage tanks.  Remote video camera, ROV or potable water diver we have a method for every budget.

Call us toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

Cleaning Potable Water Storage Tanks is what we do

Divers prepare to go into a potable water storage tank

Divers prepare to go into a potable water storage tank by washing down with a 200ppm chlorine solution.  On this date 3 to 6 inches of sediment was removed form a 300,000 gallon tank.

Diver entering potable water

The certified diver is wearing a dry suit and full face mask.  The dry suit ensures that no part of the divers body touches the water.  All of the equipment is purchased for and only used in potable water.  Many off-shore companies have a hard time sticking to this rule when they only work in potable water tanks occasionally.  RON PERRIN WATER TECHNOLOGIES divers work in potable water every week.  Potable water inspection and tank cleaning is #1 job.

Having your water tanks inspected and cleaned when needed is the best way to insure the health of your system.

Call us today toll free at 1-888-481-1768.  Or fax a list of your tanks and sizes to 817-246-1740 for a QUICK QUOTE!