Diver Wanted

ESTABLISHED WATER TANK AND TOWER INSPECTION AND CLEANING COMPANY is seeking a commercial diver. CURRENT SCUBA certification and recent diving physical is required, preference given to ADC certified line air divers. We have a full time opening working out of our Main Office in Ft Worth, Tx. This position requires frequent out of town travel (2-5 days a week, often work on a 4 day work week with 3 days off). A valid Drivers license and good driving record is required. For additional information and application see: http://www.ronperrin.com/employment.htm. FOR INTERVIEW Call our Office Manager Debi at 817-377-4899.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $140.00 /day

Job Location:

  • Fort Worth, TX 76108

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: What’s in Your Water?

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: What’s in Your Water?  is a documentary where microbiologists and tank inspection professionals discuss the importance of having potable water storage tanks inspected and cleaned regularly. Currently the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has no regulations that require potable water storage tanks to be cleaned. We are hoping to raise awareness of this issue in order to change that.

We have been working on this project for over two years and it it time to raise some cash to finish it up.  I hope you will be a part of this, please click here and find out how you can help!  https://igg.me/at/whatsinyourwater/x/11623864

THE EPA MAY SOON REQUIRE ALL WATER STORAGE TANKS AND TOWERS TO BE INSPECTED AND CLEANED

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

On October 15th 2014 the EPA held a meeting to decide if there should be a rule to require water storage tanks and towers to be cleaned and inspected.

The webinar is over but the EPA is still taking comments until the end of 2014.  If you would like to make a comment on this issue, please send an e-mail to:  SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com. Or take the poll below and I will send in the results at the end of the year.  This is a chance to let your opinion be known!

My customers tell me they need less chlorine to meet water quality standards after I remove the sediment from water storage thanks and towers.  Sediment enters the tank one particle at a time and eventually accumulates enough for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to use it as a habitat, grow and become a serious health

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

problem.  If proper inspections are not done to determine sediment levels, corrective action is seldom, if ever, taken.  My opinion is that potable water storage facilities should be inspected inside and out every year, and a cleaning program to assure tanks and towers are cleaned every 3 to 5 years should be in place on all tanks.  What do you think?

We offer potable water tank inspections and cleaning.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry providing state-of-the-art inspections with remote underwater cameras.  Our inspection reports are the best in the industry, covering all state requirements for water tank and tower inspection and meeting all AWWA guidelines.  Our inspections cover over 30 inspection points.  Digital photography documents the condition of your tank, and our narrated underwater video lets you see first-hand what the inside roof walls and floor areas of the tank look like.

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For those experiencing an EPA total coliform violation, our underwater inspections are a perfect place to start assessing your problem. Should accumulated sediment be found in the tank, our potable water dive crew can offer a cleaning solution that may be the only step needed to satisfy the Revised Total Coliform Rule requirement to take action.  Accumulated tank sediment can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and other contaminants.  Removing the sediment is often the only step required to comply with the Revised Total Coliform Rule**, in fact, our customers tell us time after time that their chlorine costs were significantly reduced after the tank was cleaned.

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Diving in potable water is an art.  Unlike offshore divers, potable water divers must be able to enter the water system without disrupting sediment on the floor of the tanks.  Our divers are sealed in a dry suit so no part of their body touches the water.  They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet AWWA and state standards.  The diver is then free to go into the confined space inside the water storage tanks. Underwater, the diver can do a more detailed inspection, or clean the loose sediment from the floor of the tank.

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We are here to help you get it done!  We offer the most choices for your inspection needs:

*Remote underwater camera (drop camera)

*ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle (specially designed and only used in potable water)

*Diver inspection – For the most detail

*Basic state requirements covered with, or without, photos to meet budget needs

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We have served over 500 water utilities since 1997.  Our customers include municipalities, prisons, universities and military bases.  They all have one thing in common – they wanted comprehensive documentation about the status of their water tank, with no water loss and no disruption in service.

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For more information about in-service tank inspections and cleaning, please see our primary web site at: www.ronperrin.com .

Or call 888-481-1768 for a free no obligation quote.

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**On February 13, 2013, EPA published in the Federal Register the revisions to the 1989 TCR.  EPA anticipates greater public   health protection under the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requirements.  The RTCR:

  • Requires public water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems; and
  • Establishes criteria for systems to qualify for and stay on reduced monitoring, which could reduce water system burden and provide incentives for better system operation.
  • Click here for more information about the RTCR.

Assessment and Corrective Action required under RTCR

Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.  Lets talk about Assessment and Corrective action.

Under the RTCR, there is no longer a monthly maximum contaminant level (MCL) violation for multiple total coliform detections.  New revisions require systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system to assess the problem and take corrective action that may reduce cases of illnesses and deaths due to potential fecal contamination and waterborne pathogen exposure.   The rule says “The Distribution System”  of course, what that means is,  “The Water Utility Manager or Operator” is now required to assess the problem and take corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.

Getting started assessing the problem:

A tank inspection may be the best place to start with the assessment.  Is the vent screen in place?  Are there birds or insects in the tank?  There are at least 12 steps to a water tank inspection and at least one of them should be to get a look inside the facility to see if there is sediment on the floor of the tank.  Over time, sediment will build up on the floor area of almost all water storage tanks and towers.  One to three inches is not uncommon here in Texas. Sediment is known to be a habitat for bacteria, protozoa and viruses.  Inspection contractors can offer great documentation of the interior condition of water storage tanks with no disruption in water utility service.  Using remotely operated cameras, inspection robots, or even potable water divers, high tech contractors can deliver great information about the water storage tank or tower.  For information on in-service Water Tank and Tower Inspections, see our inspection page at www.ronperrin.com. For tips on doing your own potable water tank or tower inspection, see: Do your own potable Water Tank Inspection at:  THE TANK DIVER blog.

Corrective action may be as simple as basic housekeeping.  If you know the facility has never been cleaned there is more than a good chance sediment inside the structure needs to be removed.  Again, a qualified diving contractor can save time, water and money by removing all loose sediment with minimal water loss or disruption in service.  For more information on using a Potable Water Dive Crew to clean your potable water tank or tower see our cleaning page: www.ronperrin.com/cleaning

Our tank cleaning customers tell us time and again that their chlorine use was significantly reduced after we cleaned their facility.   With regular inspections and cleanings your likelihood of a coliform contamination are greatly reduced,  if not completely eliminated.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Sediment sample

Sediment samples

To request a tank inspection or cleaning quote, call Ron Perrin Water Technologies toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

DEEP TREKKER ROV – First Test Run June 2013

UPDATE JULY 1, 2020.

In 2013 We Purchased a DEEP TREKKER ROV to use inspecting potable water storage tanks and towers.  I am happy to report it is still working and doing a great job in 2020.
This video shows our first “Test Flight” in a clear-well and the second inspection we did on a ground storage tank. We added a safety rope to protect the tether and found the lighting system caused a little bit of glare when we went into darker parts of the tank, but it was reduced when we got closer to the inspection points we needed to look at. Overall, we found it to be a very good inspection tool!

To learn more about what may be in potable water tanks and towers visit:

“THE CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT”

For more information on RON PERRIN WATER TECHNOLOGIES click here or visit www.ronperrin.com

Do you need a Potable water tank or tower inspected?

Our inspection methods offer the most information for the least cost,  all of our inspection methods include an underwater DVD allowing you to see what is in your storage tanks.  Remote video camera, ROV or potable water diver we have a method for every budget.

Call us toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below:

Recent Water Tower Cleaning had a few surprises

Sediment Samples from tower cleaning

Potable water tower

Sediment Being Removed from the interior floor of tower

Sediment Being Removed from the interior floor of tower

We recently cleaned a potable water storage tower that had not been cleaned since it was built in the mid 1980’s.  This facility was in compliance, it had been inspected once a year, but due to the fact that there are no set rules on when to clean water storage tanks in Texas it had never been cleaned.

Sediment sample

Sediment sample

We used a Celestron LED digital microscope to take a close look at the sediment removed from the floor of the tank.  I posted what we found on my blog titled: THE CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT at www.ronperrin.us.  Due to the fact that rules on inspecting and cleaning potable water storage facilities vary greatly from state to state we may soon see changes in this area of Federal Regulation.

Currently most states do not have specific rules on when potable water storage tanks should be cleaned.

Please visit my CLEAN WATER TANK PROJECT blog and take the poll a few post down from the top.  I would like feedback if you think the EPA should make a standardized requirement of cleaning and inspection of the nations drinking water tanks and towers.

If you are on LINKED IN please Join my network HERE.

THE BOOK

THE BOOK

DO YOU NEED YOUR WATER STORAGE TANK OR TOWER Inspected or CLEANED?  Call 888-481-1768

ARE YOU HAVING TROUBLE GETTING THE FUNDS YOU NEED to Inspect or clean your water storage tank?
YOU NEED MY BOOK! Show your Director, or Manager what sediment looks like that builds up in water tanks over time!

CHAPTER FOUR covers Contaminates In our Water!

CHAPTER SEVEN covers Inspection Methods.

CHAPTER EIGHT covers Cleaning Methods with color photos of sediment being removed!

CLICK HERE To Order: Inspecting & Cleaning Potable Water Storage by Ron Perrin

Florida Rule Requires Tanks to be inspected and cleaned at least once every five years

Our company can help your Florida Utility meet the requirements for water tank inspection and cleaning under 62-555.350 with no or little disruption in your water service.  For more information see our main web page at http://www.ronperrin.com for a free quote call 888-481-1768 or fax a list of your tanks to 817-246-1740. The Florida standard is the most aggressive in the country requiring all potable water storage tanks to be cleaned and inspected by a licensed Florida P.E. at least once every five years.  The rule also requires some tanks at water processing plants to be cleaned every year. Read more here: 62-555.350 Operation and Maintenance of Public Water Systems. (1) Suppliers of water shall operate and maintain their public water systems so as to comply with applicable standards in Chapter 62-550, F.A.C., and requirements in this chapter. (2) Suppliers of water shall keep all necessary public water system components in operation and shall maintain such components in good operating condition so the components function as intended. Preventive maintenance on electrical or mechanical equipment – including exercising of auxiliary power sources, checking the calibration of finished-drinking-water meters at treatment plants, testing of air or pressure relief valves for hydropneumatic tanks, and exercising of isolation valves – shall be performed in accordance with the equipment manufacturer’s recommendations or in accordance with a written preventive maintenance program established by the supplier of water; however, in no case shall auxiliary power sources be run under load less frequently than monthly. Accumulated sludge and biogrowths shall be cleaned routinely (i.e., at least annually) from all treatment facilities that are in contact with raw, partially treated, or finished drinking water and that are not specifically designed to collect sludge or support a biogrowth; and blistering, chipped, or cracked coatings and linings on treatment or storage facilities in contact with raw, partially treated, or finished drinking water shall be rehabilitated or repaired. Finished-drinking-water storage tanks, including conventional hydropneumatic tanks with an access manhole but excluding bladder- or diaphragm-type hydropneumatic tanks without an access manhole, shall be checked at least annually to ensure that hatches are closed and screens are in place; shall be cleaned at least once every five years to remove biogrowths, calcium or iron/manganese deposits, and sludge from inside the tanks; and shall be inspected for structural and coating integrity at least once every five years by personnel under the responsible charge of a professional engineer licensed in Florida. Dead-end water mains conveying finished drinking water shall be flushed quarterly or in accordance with a written flushing program established by the supplier of water; additionally, dead-end or other water mains conveying finished water shall be flushed as necessary whenever legitimate water quality complaints are received. ——— Serving the Midwest & Southeast U.S. Ron Perrin Water Technologies is ready to work! For a free quote call 888-481-1768,  fax your tank sizes & type to 817-246-1740,  or e-mail ronlooks@aol.com

Have your potable water storage tanks been cleaned lately ?

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Sediment being removed from a potable water storage tank

Potable Water Tank cleaning

Photo: Sediment being removed from Potable Water Storage Tank.

*       The American Water Works Association recommends that tanks be cleaned at least every three years.  Recent focus on pharmaceuticals in water systems have made more people than ever aware of contaminates that may be lurking in their water supply.   Although pharmaceuticals in drinking water may be in the news the real threat is random bacteria and cryptosporidium spores.

The Threat of Bacteria-

Countless kinds of bacteria can make their way into a public water supply.  Chlorine and other treatment methods are our first line of defense.  When potable water storage tanks are clean small amounts of bacteria that survive the treatment process cycle through the system undetected and harmless due to the small quantity.  Sediment in the tank can capture and harbor these small amounts of bacteria.  The bacteria can start to grow hidden from chlorine deep in the sediment.  Chlorine can even be overwhelmed and depleted if a nitrate eating bacteria is collected.   As the bacteria continues to grow in the sediment month after month and year after year the threat to public health grows.       

  The Threat of Cryptosporidium

The threat of cryptosporidium outbreak is even greater with sediment in the floor of a water storage tank.   Again Sediment can harbor bacteria, cryptosporidium and other contaminates.  The best defense to insure a protozoa like  cryptosporidium will not take up residence in your water storage system may be to keep the tanks free of sediment.  In the Spring of 1993 over 100 people died as a result of a cryptosporidium outbreak that was directly associated with the Howard Avenue Water Purification Plant.  This was the largest water born disease ever documented in United States history.  It is estimated that over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea.  

Due to the fact that cryptosporidium is a protozoa parasite with a thick outer shell it is highly resistant to disinfectants such as chlorine.  The best defense to ensure it will not inhabit your water system may be to make sure your water tanks remain sediment free.  This will remove and habitat that small amounts bacteria or protozoa could lodge and grow in, Preventing possible public health problem in the most simple way.  Keeping water storage tanks clean.    

Sediment being removed

Photo: Sediment being removed from Potable Water Storage Tank.

What is in the floor of your tank Call RON PERRIN to find out 1-888-481-1768

See www.ronperrin.com  for more details.