Water Tank Inspection – Shopping for a Potable Water Tank Inspector? Think about This-

Here are a few things to consider when shopping for a contractor to perform work in a potable water storage tank.

  1. Look for a specialist
  2. Check photos on their web site
  3. Check references
  4. Require an insurance certificate
  5. Proper training for employees performing work

Specialist: We live in an age of specialist.  As a rule Specialist know their topic inside and out.  When contracting a company to enter your potable water system it is better to deal with a contractor who is focused on entering potable water systems.  Companies who do nothing but service potable water systems are more likely to have equipment only used in potable water system.  Specialist in potable water work are also more likely to have disinfection procedures and a disinfection solution that meets AWWA standards.  When it is your business to do it you are just more likely to do it right.

Photos: No matter what you see on advertisements, or told on the phone, a quick check of a companie’s web site can quickly show you what their focus is on.  Many diving contractors are simply focused on Diving.  Potable water diving may just be one of the things on their long list of things they do to make money diving.  If the photos on their web sight show diving in lakes, rivers, and streams you need to trust them to somehow clean their equipment enough to enter your water system.  Like they say, a photo is worth a million words. Some contractors say they have reserved equipment they only use in potable water.  However, the photos on their own web site may show they actually use the same gear to do all diving services.  If you can find a company that specializes in potable water diving, the photos on their web site should confirm that claim, not dispute it.

References:  If a company has been working for more than a week or two, they should have references.  Ask for a list of customers that you may be allowed to contact.  Another way to check references is by looking at their company Facebook page, or the owner’s linked-in page.

Insurance:  Ask for a certificate of insurance sent from the companies insurance agent. Do not accept a certificate sent directly from the contractor. It is just too easy to change dates or fabricate the certificate from scratch.  Make sure the contractor has Liability, workers comp and commercial auto.  While they are all important, the workers comp may be the most difficult and expensive for the contractor to acquire.  Climbing and diving into potable water storage tanks and towers is “high risk contracting” by any measure.  If an accident occurs, and the contractor is not covered by his own workers compensation insurance, the customer will be liable for the injured employee.

Training:  High risk contracting may only be done safely if the contractor has required before employment, or taken the time to send each and every employee on the job site proper training.  The majority, if not all diving contractors, require that divers have diving certifications before employment is offered.  Beyond dive training, employees should also have documentation showing they have had both Confined Space and Fall Protection training.

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Photo:  Len Pardee is the Lead Tank Inspector for Ron Perrin Water Technologies.  Len has a degree in Environmental Engineering from Syracuse University. He is retired from the USEPA where he served for 34 years.  Among other posts while at the USEPA, Len was the Chief of the Region 6 Water Division for several years.

At Ron Perrin Water Technologies we take time to make sure the inspectors we send out to perform inspections have the right gear, insurance coverage and training to safely do your inspection or cleaning both efficiently and safely.  By using a state-of-the-art  under- water video camera and lighting system, we are able to collect all the information we need to produce your inspection report  while the tank remains in-service. In addition to the underwater video, our reports also feature dozens of high quality digital photos covering all AWWA inspection points.  Our innovative inspection methods have been refined by Ron Perrin since 1997 and are featured in a class he instructs for the Environmental Training Institute at UT Arlington.  Information on the course may be found at the ETI Website See WTR308 Water Tank Inspection Techniques

For more information see www.rpwt.us. For a water tank inspection or cleaning quote call Debi at 817-377-4899 or e-mail tankinspections@aol.com.

 

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: What’s in Your Water?

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: What’s in Your Water?  is a documentary where microbiologists and tank inspection professionals discuss the importance of having potable water storage tanks inspected and cleaned regularly. Currently the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has no regulations that require potable water storage tanks to be cleaned. We are hoping to raise awareness of this issue in order to change that.

We have been working on this project for over two years and it it time to raise some cash to finish it up.  I hope you will be a part of this, please click here and find out how you can help!  https://igg.me/at/whatsinyourwater/x/11623864

ARE YOU A CUSTOMER?

Please write a review, we would love to post your comments about our service. We are celebrating our 18th year inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks and towers. I am proud to report that I have maintained my first customer this entire time. We now have many utilities we have serviced for over 17 years. Old or new, if you are one of our customers we would like to hear from you! Please take a minute and write a short review on our Facebook page page!

https://www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

The Crew 2012

The Crew 2013

On the NEWS with i-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

November 7th, 2014, Ginger Allen and the CBS 11 i-Team watches as my company inspects and cleans a north Texas water tower. The tower was cleaned as a normal maintenance procedure. A light- brown dusting of sediment was removed from the interior floor before it could get deep enough to support bacteria and become a problem.  

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The tower was cleaned by a Commercial Diver who was trained at OCEAN CORP, Houston, Texas. The Diver is sealed in his own environment, then washed down with a chlorine solution. Because we specialize in the inspection and cleaning of Potable Water Storage Facilities, all of our equipment is purchased for, and only used in, potable water.

This utility is doing a great job of maintaining their system. However, utility managers across the country struggle to get the funds to properly maintain their systems. The EPA is currently considering a regulation that would require all water storage facilities to be inspected and cleaned at regular intervals. This new requirement could improve the water quality for millions of Americans.

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

Ron Perrin Speaks to I-Team Reporter Ginger Allen

The EPA is taking comments on this proposed regulation until the end of the year. We have the contact information posted on our blog, or you can just take our poll at: www.cleanwatertankproject.com. The poll results will be turned in to the EPA at the end of the year.

Sediment being removed

Sediment being removed

Safe tap water is something everyone should have.

Crew Prepares for Dive

Crew Prepares for Dive

                                          Click Here to see:    CBS DFW_ VIDEO

 

NEWSsinc.com VIDEO

     SEE THE FULL STORY HERE: 

CBS 11 DFW NEWS STORY  http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/11/19/water-towers/

This story aired on 

Thanks for taking the time to check this out.

Photos taken by

RPWT Office Manager Debi Wheelan

Find us on FACEBOOK  or connect with Ron on Linked-In

Visit my You Tube Channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/RonPerrin for more great videos like these:

THE EPA MAY SOON REQUIRE ALL WATER STORAGE TANKS AND TOWERS TO BE INSPECTED AND CLEANED

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

Ron Perrin Owner Ron Perrin Water Technologies

On October 15th 2014 the EPA held a meeting to decide if there should be a rule to require water storage tanks and towers to be cleaned and inspected.

The webinar is over but the EPA is still taking comments until the end of 2014.  If you would like to make a comment on this issue, please send an e-mail to:  SFIWebinar@cadmusgroup.com. Or take the poll below and I will send in the results at the end of the year.  This is a chance to let your opinion be known!

My customers tell me they need less chlorine to meet water quality standards after I remove the sediment from water storage thanks and towers.  Sediment enters the tank one particle at a time and eventually accumulates enough for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses to use it as a habitat, grow and become a serious health

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

10-14-14 Washington D.C. Mall

problem.  If proper inspections are not done to determine sediment levels, corrective action is seldom, if ever, taken.  My opinion is that potable water storage facilities should be inspected inside and out every year, and a cleaning program to assure tanks and towers are cleaned every 3 to 5 years should be in place on all tanks.  What do you think?

Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that can be in tank sediment

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Sediment being removed from the floor of a potable water storage tank by a dive crew.

Removing sediment from the floor of your water tanks and towers may also be removing the habitat that allows bacteria, protozoa and viruses from getting a foothold in your distribution system.   Now we can add a brain-eating amoeba to the list of contaminants that the sediment on the floor of your water storage tank can support.

September 16, 2013, NBC News reported: “Deadly brain amoeba infects US tap water for the first time”. The death of a 4-year-old boy near Violet, LA., was linked to the Naegleria fowleri amoeba. The child had been playing on a backyard slip-n-slide that used water from the St. Bernard Parish water system, that was later found to be contaminated with the amoeba. “Tests show it’s present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.”

According to the CDC:  “Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba” or “brain-eating ameba”), is a free-living microscopic ameba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. Naegleria fowleri usually infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. In very rare instances,Naegleria infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from drinking water contaminated with Naegleria.”

The CDC also tested nearby DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1 because it was the near the site of an infection that happened in 2011 from non-potable water (lake or river, etc.). On October 8, 2013, The CDC confirmed the presence of the rare amoeba in five locations in DeSoto Parish Waterworks Dist. #1.

Click Here to see the map:  NUMBER OF CASE-REPORTS OF PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS CAUSED BY NAEGLERIA FOWLERI

Heat is also a factor, an increase in only ten degrees can double the speed of bacteria growth. As record high temperatures become more common in summer months we see that keeping water distribution tanks free of sediment build up may be more important than ever before. Removing the sediment from your water tank may prevent a disaster before it can ever start.

 

Ron Perrin

         Ron Perrin

Ron Perrin is the owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies in Fort Worth, Texas. Since 1997 his company has inspected over six thousand water storage tanks and towers in 14 states. Ron may be contacted through his web site at www.ronperrin.com.

Debi Wheelan Office Manager

Debi Wheelan

For a free proposal to clean and inspect your potable water storage tanks and towers please call Debi at 817-377-4899.

or e-mail  tankinspections@aol.com

 

Assessment and Corrective Action required under RTCR

Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requires assessment and corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.  Lets talk about Assessment and Corrective action.

Under the RTCR, there is no longer a monthly maximum contaminant level (MCL) violation for multiple total coliform detections.  New revisions require systems that have indicators of coliform contamination in the distribution system to assess the problem and take corrective action that may reduce cases of illnesses and deaths due to potential fecal contamination and waterborne pathogen exposure.   The rule says “The Distribution System”  of course, what that means is,  “The Water Utility Manager or Operator” is now required to assess the problem and take corrective action when there are indications of coliform contamination.

Getting started assessing the problem:

A tank inspection may be the best place to start with the assessment.  Is the vent screen in place?  Are there birds or insects in the tank?  There are at least 12 steps to a water tank inspection and at least one of them should be to get a look inside the facility to see if there is sediment on the floor of the tank.  Over time, sediment will build up on the floor area of almost all water storage tanks and towers.  One to three inches is not uncommon here in Texas. Sediment is known to be a habitat for bacteria, protozoa and viruses.  Inspection contractors can offer great documentation of the interior condition of water storage tanks with no disruption in water utility service.  Using remotely operated cameras, inspection robots, or even potable water divers, high tech contractors can deliver great information about the water storage tank or tower.  For information on in-service Water Tank and Tower Inspections, see our inspection page at www.ronperrin.com. For tips on doing your own potable water tank or tower inspection, see: Do your own potable Water Tank Inspection at:  THE TANK DIVER blog.

Corrective action may be as simple as basic housekeeping.  If you know the facility has never been cleaned there is more than a good chance sediment inside the structure needs to be removed.  Again, a qualified diving contractor can save time, water and money by removing all loose sediment with minimal water loss or disruption in service.  For more information on using a Potable Water Dive Crew to clean your potable water tank or tower see our cleaning page: www.ronperrin.com/cleaning

Our tank cleaning customers tell us time and again that their chlorine use was significantly reduced after we cleaned their facility.   With regular inspections and cleanings your likelihood of a coliform contamination are greatly reduced,  if not completely eliminated.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Inspector climbs 750,000 gallon water storage tower.

Sediment sample

Sediment samples

To request a tank inspection or cleaning quote, call Ron Perrin Water Technologies toll free at 888-481-1768 or simply fill out the form below: