Inspection Contractor for 30 years!

I have been a Water Tank Inspection Contractor for over 30 years. Starting in 1991, my first inspections were done on my days off while still working as a full-time Texas Peace Officer. I was a principal at Tank Diver Inspections (TDI) a startup company that failed. Form 1994 to 96 I was director of marketing at U.S. Underwater Services in 96 I was promoted to Director of Operations. In 1997 I established Ron Perrin Water Technologies and devoted myself to developing the best methods to inspect and clean potable water storage tanks with NO DISRUPTION in water service. We incorporated in 2020. We offer the best inspection in the industry. We are here to serve you! We offer three different water storage tanks inspections, all include underwater documentation with our underwater video cameras and lighting systems.


Our Company
 provides nondisruptive water tank inspections on potable water storage tanks in Texas and 14 other states. In Texas, our tank inspections meet all requirements found under Texas Administrative code 290.46 (m)(1) -Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.  We want to be your Contracted Inspection Service.

In Texas you must examine your ground, elevated, and pressure storage tanks at least once every year to make sure they are in good working condition. Tanks should be inspected no later than one year after the last time you checked them.

Ground and elevated tanks are required to be inspected inside and out every year. Pressure tanks also need to be inspected on the outside every year and if they have an inspection port they are required to have the interior inspected once every five years. The grounds and facilities shall be maintained in a manner so as to minimize the possibility of the harboring of rodents, insects, and other disease vectors, and in such a way as to prevent other conditions that might cause the contamination of the water.  (1) Each of the system’s ground, elevated, and pressure tanks shall be inspected annually by water system personnel or contracted inspection service.    (A) Ground and elevated storage tank inspections must determine that the vents are in place and properly screened, the roof hatches closed and locked, flap valves and gaskets provide adequate protection against insects, rodents, and other vermin, the interior and exterior coating systems are continuing to provide adequate protection to all metal surfaces, and the tank remains in a watertight condition.  

It is extremely important these facilities be properly inspected, we recently inspected a ground storage tank that had a damaged vent screen, inside on the floor of the tank we found two dead rats. Not what you want in a water tank that you are drinking out of. Birds and insects are much more common, it there is a hole in the vent screen that you can put your finger in you can bet there are insects in the tank. It the hole is big enough to put your fist in there is a good chance you will find a dead bird. On a hot day, the animals can smell the water if there is a way for them to get it they will. Like a big lobster trap they can get in but they can’t get out. Let’s take a look at your tanks!

We have several inspections to choose from:

  • Remote Underwater Video – This is is our most popular and economical inspection. We document all State required inspection points. Our report is delivered in a notebook with photographs of inspection points and an underwater video that covers the interior roof, water surface, waterline and underwater areas visible from our remote underwater camera and lighting system.
  • Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV)- Covers everything above with additional underwater video taken from one of our ROV’s. This allows you to get a more detailed inspection for much larger facilities. It also allows a customer to get great documentation on specific areas if needed.
  • Diver Inspection– Our potable water dive crew is usually reserved to clean water storage tanks and towers. The divers are sealed in their own environment using a DRY SUIT. No part of the divers body touches the water in addition, to meet state and federal requirements divers are washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution. Divers are able to get an even more detailed inspection.
  • Tank Cleaning and Inspection– All of our inspections include an underwater video of tank floors. This allows us to get a good estimate of accumulated sediment. It is important to know how much sediment is in the tank. Sediment on the floor of the tank that can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa and even viruses. Our cleaning service removes all loose sediment. After the sediment is removed we are able to see the floor of the tank allowing us to document the condition of the paint and see corroded areas if any. When is the last time your tanks were cleaned?

If you are task with inspecting your own tank we can help with that too. I teach a course at the Environmental Training Institute (ETI) located at the UT Arlington Division for Enterprise Development. The class is 16 hours over two days and has class dates scheduled in 2021 and 2022.

WTR 308 Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques

Course NameMeetsBeginsEndsFee
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesW&Th 8:30 A–5:30 P09/29/2109/30/21650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh&F 8:30 AM–5:30 P08/18/2208/19/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection Techniques (Online)Th& F 8:30 A–5:30 P04/14/2204/15/22650.00
Potable Water Storage Inspection TechniquesTh& F 8:30 A–5:30 P12/08/2212/09/22650.00

If you cant make the class I also offer a review of what you need to look at online see:

www.watertankinspecton.co – A DIY Guide to Inspecting Potable Water Storage Tanks.

Last in Texas you will need to maintain a Water Tank Inspection Log

PWS Water Tank Inspection Log – Texas.gov

If we may be of service please contact us.

For a free quote for inspection or cleaning e-mail Robert at perrinsales@gmail.com or call 817-377-4899.

For more info see; www.ronperrin.com or or blog www.tankdiver.us.

Serving the Water Utility Industry Since 1997

We have been working for the VA Hospital in Kerrville since 1999. We recently cleaned both of their towers again. The older concrete tank was built after WWI, the modern-looking metal tower was built after WWII. We have some customers like VA Kerrville that have been using our service for over 20 years. We are here when you need us, for a free quote call us toll-free, 1-888-481-1768 or e-mail perrinsales@gmail.com.

Ron Perrin at VA Hospital – Kerrville, Texas (c)2015 ronperrin.us
VA Hospital – Kerrville, Texas (c)2015.ronperrin.us

Our potable water dive crew is able to enter the water system to perform cleaning and other minor repairs with no disruption in service. This has always been a top priority at VA Hospital Kerrville. No mater what your situation we can provide inspection and cleaning services that will keep your water flowing. For more information see our web page at: www.ronperrin.us.

We are here when you need us, for a free quote call us toll-free, 1-888-481-1768 or e-mail perrinsales@gmail.com.

Water Tank & Tower Inspection and Cleaning

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks and towers. We are based out of Fort Worth, Texas with personnel that also call Houston home.

We work in over a dozen states with the bulk of our customers located in Texas. We offer the most information for the lowest possible cost. Our most popular inspection uses a remote underwater camera. With this close look below the waterline we are able to give our customers a first hand look at their water storage facilities with no disruption in service.

For a free quote call 817-377-4899, use the free quote form on the right side of this blog or e-mail a list of your tanks to perrinsales@gmail.com.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. may also be reached toll free at: 1-888-481-1768

Tank inspection camera
water tank inspection camera (C) 2010 Ron Perrin Water Technologies

In addition to our remote camera inspection we also offer a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) inspection and for the most detail our potable water diver crew is available.

Water Tank Inspection ROV
DEEP TREKKER ROV (c) 2014 Ron Perrin

All of our inspections cover all AWWA and State inspection requirements documented with photos of each inspection point a video that covers the exterior and interior roof and underwater areas. The remote underwater camera also called a drop camera inspection is a excellent inspection tool for smaller and mid-sized water storage facilities. The ROV is useful when specific areas need to be looked at or to get to the rear of larger facilities.

The dive crew may be the best choice if a more detailed report is needed or if additional work is needed such as tank cleaning or leek repair. We have a new service that was developed exclusively for standpipe type water storage tanks. Standpipe tanks have deeper water than most other tanks making it extremely hazardous for divers. Our cleaning robot offers a unique way to remove sediment and allow your tank to stay in-service. See our other blog post for more information and photos.

Ron Perrin Potable Water Diver Photo (c) 2020 RonPerrin.us

Pricing is quick and free, simply give us a call toll free at 1-888-481-1768. If you prefer using a fax just fax a list of your tanks to 817-246-1740. Be sure to include exactly what type of inspection you would like us to quote. We will need to know the gallon size of the tanks and if they are GST, EST, clear-wells (underground) or standpipe type.

If you prefer to email your request send it to perrinsales@gmail.com.

After the Storm

All Potable Water Tanks should be Inspected. This may not be the first thing water utilities think about after severe storms. With damage to utility offices and vehicles, the potable water storage tanks and towers are often overlooked. If you need your tanks and towers inspected we are here to help. Ron Perrin Water Technologies, Inc. has been inspecting tanks and towers since 1997. We use underwater video cameras so there is no disruption in your utility water service. Call 1-888-481-1768 or see www.ronperrin.us for more details.

In-Service municipal water tank inspection and cleaning

Our business is to help water utilities keep drinking water up to standards and safe to drink. We save utilities time, and money while saving millions of gallons of treated drinking water each month (sometimes each day). 

We do this by inspecting water storage tanks with remote cameras while they remain in-service and full of drinking water.  If the tank or the water tower has sediment build up our potable water dive crew can remove sediment from the facility with minimal water loss and usually no disruption in service.

Ron Perrin – Inspecting water tanks and towers since 1997.

This process removes bacteria, protozoa, and even viruses that can live, thrive and grow in the tank sediment that builds-up on the floor of virtually every water storage facility.  Your zip code should not determine how safe your municipal water is to drink.

Our remote camera inspections are very affordable and our cleaning process cost much less than draining and removing the tank from service for cleaning. Of the top eleven contaminates for municipal drinking water systems according to the CDC, our method of removing tank sediment eliminates the habitat that eight of them can use to get a foothold in water systems.

Water Tank Cleaning
Water tank cleaning with potable water dive crew.

Photo: Potable Water Storage tank being cleaned by potable water dive crew.

For a quote to inspect or clean your municipal water tanks or towers give us a call toll free at 888-481-1768.

Visit our web page at: www.watertankinspection.com

NEW VIDEO PODCAST Series – TAP TALK, WHAT IS IN YOUR DRINKING WATER?

In our new video series Tap-Talk where we discuss what is really in your water system. For years we have been working on a feature-length documentary film. Our working title is “Out of Sight- Out of Mind, what’s in your water?” This video POD series will tap into some of the things that we found along the way as we continue to put this important film together. We will take you into public water systems like no one else has, as we inspect and clean municipal water tanks and towers with remote underwater cameras and commercially trained divers. This video is the introduction.

For a free water tank inspection or cleaning quote call toll free 1-888-481-1768 or e-mail Robert Perrin at perrinsales@gmail.com.

Water Tank Inspection – Shopping for a Potable Water Tank Inspector? Think about This-

Here are a few things to consider when shopping for a contractor to perform work in a potable water storage tank.

  1. Look for a specialist
  2. Check photos on their web site
  3. Check references
  4. Require an insurance certificate
  5. Proper training for employees performing work

Specialist: We live in an age of specialist.  As a rule Specialist know their topic inside and out.  When contracting a company to enter your potable water system it is better to deal with a contractor who is focused on entering potable water systems.  Companies who do nothing but service potable water systems are more likely to have equipment only used in potable water system.  Specialist in potable water work are also more likely to have disinfection procedures and a disinfection solution that meets AWWA standards.  When it is your business to do it you are just more likely to do it right.

Photos: No matter what you see on advertisements, or told on the phone, a quick check of a companie’s web site can quickly show you what their focus is on.  Many diving contractors are simply focused on Diving.  Potable water diving may just be one of the things on their long list of things they do to make money diving.  If the photos on their web sight show diving in lakes, rivers, and streams you need to trust them to somehow clean their equipment enough to enter your water system.  Like they say, a photo is worth a million words. Some contractors say they have reserved equipment they only use in potable water.  However, the photos on their own web site may show they actually use the same gear to do all diving services.  If you can find a company that specializes in potable water diving, the photos on their web site should confirm that claim, not dispute it.

References:  If a company has been working for more than a week or two, they should have references.  Ask for a list of customers that you may be allowed to contact.  Another way to check references is by looking at their company Facebook page, or the owner’s linked-in page.

Insurance:  Ask for a certificate of insurance sent from the companies insurance agent. Do not accept a certificate sent directly from the contractor. It is just too easy to change dates or fabricate the certificate from scratch.  Make sure the contractor has Liability, workers comp and commercial auto.  While they are all important, the workers comp may be the most difficult and expensive for the contractor to acquire.  Climbing and diving into potable water storage tanks and towers is “high risk contracting” by any measure.  If an accident occurs, and the contractor is not covered by his own workers compensation insurance, the customer will be liable for the injured employee.

Training:  High risk contracting may only be done safely if the contractor has required before employment, or taken the time to send each and every employee on the job site proper training.  The majority, if not all diving contractors, require that divers have diving certifications before employment is offered.  Beyond dive training, employees should also have documentation showing they have had both Confined Space and Fall Protection training.

20180207_111442

Photo:  Len Pardee is the Lead Tank Inspector for Ron Perrin Water Technologies.  Len has a degree in Environmental Engineering from Syracuse University. He is retired from the USEPA where he served for 34 years.  Among other posts while at the USEPA, Len was the Chief of the Region 6 Water Division for several years.

At Ron Perrin Water Technologies we take time to make sure the inspectors we send out to perform inspections have the right gear, insurance coverage and training to safely do your inspection or cleaning both efficiently and safely.  By using a state-of-the-art  under- water video camera and lighting system, we are able to collect all the information we need to produce your inspection report  while the tank remains in-service. In addition to the underwater video, our reports also feature dozens of high quality digital photos covering all AWWA inspection points.  Our innovative inspection methods have been refined by Ron Perrin since 1997 and are featured in a class he instructs for the Environmental Training Institute at UT Arlington.  Information on the course may be found at the ETI Website See WTR308 Water Tank Inspection Techniques

For more information see www.rpwt.us. For a water tank inspection or cleaning quote call Debi at 817-377-4899 or e-mail tankinspections@aol.com.

 

The Importance of a Water Tank Inspection

I write a lot about inspecting and cleaning water storage tanks.  My focus is on tanks that store potable water, or more simply, municipal drinking water.  To understand why this is so important you need to understand how water systems work.  The water we drink comes from lakes, rivers, streams or water wells and is also known as ground water.

It is then processed at a water treatment plant, smaller. Systems on well water may simply inject chlorine into the water as it goes into a storage tank.  The larger systems that most of us are on filter and process the water to perfection then send it out into the distribution system where it waits in water storage tanks and towers until it is needed.

The water storage tanks and towers serve two critical functions, they allow enough water to be at the ready so it is always available to us, the end user; it provides enough water pressure to not only get it to your tap, but also keep it safe.  The positive water pressure insures that contaminants will not enter the system.  If there is a line break the system will lose water, the break or leak also allows contaminants to be sucked in.

Any time pressure can not be maintained for any reason the system is at risk and will issue a boil water advisory or order to protect public health. The water storage tanks and towers you see around town are the last stop water makes before being served at your tap.  Water storage tanks on the ground are known as Ground Storage Tanks or GSTs, Water Towers are referred to as Elevated Storage Tanks or ESTs. These facilities have a life span of 30 to over 100 years if properly maintained.

Over time sediment builds up on the floor of GST, and EST, storage facilities. One particle at a time over several years and sometimes over several decades, sediment levels can continue to grow.  The soft sediment can become a nutrient rich habitat that according to the USEPA can support bacteria, protozoa and even viruses.  Sediment can also offer a safe harbor from treatment chemicals. As the sediment grows, more and more chemicals are used in an attempt to meet water quality standards set by the USEPA and enforced by state health or environmental agencies.

20180207_111442

This is why an annual inspection of water storage tanks and towers is so important you can not make plans to fix a problem unless you know you have the problem in the first place.

Inspection contractors often use underwater cameras to get a look at the interior conditions of the facility.  This can be done while the facility remains in service and full of water.  If the tank is found to have sediment potable water divers can be contracted to clean the water tank with minimal water loss.  Removing the layer of sediment on the floor along with all contaminants that may be living in it, this quickly restores the facility to the point that much less chlorine is needed to maintain water quality standards.

 

About our company:

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has been a leader in the inspection and cleaning of potable water storage tanks while they remain In-Service. Our company is located near Fort Worth, Texas in the DFW area. We serve Texas and fourteen other states including Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Kentucky and Florida. Of course, we inspect more tanks in our home state of Texas than any other state.

We offer three types of underwater in-service tank inspections to better meet your needs: 1) Remote Underwater Camera.  Our underwater remote video camera and lighting system is our most popular and economical inspection method. This allows you to see underwater conditions and get a good look at the floor of the facility.  2) Remotely Operated Vehicle or (ROV).  The ROV water tank inspection is the right choice for larger tanks, the ROV is equipped with motors and is able to swim to the far side of the tank for a better look. 3) Diver Inspection.  Potable Water Divers are dressed out in dry suits and washed down with a chlorine solution to meet AWWA and EPA standards.  The diver is a good choice when you want to get a good look at a specific spot in the tank.  Our most common diver inspection follows our tank cleaning service.  Divers cover the floor of the tank and any problem areas they may see using a high resolution camera and underwater lighting system this is our best inspection and it is free with each tank cleaning.

About the author and owner of Ron Perrin Water Technologies.

A former Texas Master Peace officer (1984-2006), Ron Perrin was an avid scuba diver and dove his first water storage tank in 1992.  Forming two separate companies with fellow police officers, Ron became the Director of Operations for U.S. Underwater Services in 1995.  In 1997, Ron established Ron Perrin Water Technologies.

Ron Perrin Water Technologies inspects over 800 water storage tanks a year. The methods Ron has developed to inspect and clean potable water storage tanks and towers have saved millions of gallons of treated drinking water and have improved the quality in hundreds of water systems. In 2013, Ron Perrin became an OSHA outreach trainer and is currently an authorized construction trainer.

In 2015 Ron was contracted by the Environmental Training Institute at the University of Texas at Arlington to develop a training program to safely inspect water storage tanks. WTR 308 Water Storage Inspection Techniques was offered for the first time in the 2015 summer catalog. One of the techniques is the proper use of remote underwater cameras and Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) to inspect water storage tanks and towers.

Office Phone: 817-377-4899   Toll free 1-888-481-1768

E-mail tankinspections@aol.com

Specialist in Safety and health (SSH)                                                2013

Certified Safety and Health Official (CSHO)                                    2014

Safety and Health Environmental Professional (SHEP)               2015

Published Works:

Inspecting and Cleaning Potable Water Storage   (Second Edition Due out in 2020)

By Ron Perrin. 158 page book. SBN 10: 1-4415-3244-7

Municipal Sewer & Water magazine: September 2010 edition; Pages 94-95;

Article title: Look Inside – Inspection & Cleaning of potable water storage tanks

Treatment Plant Operator Magazine: September 2017 edition: Pages 22-23

Article title: Denying Safe Harbor to Pathogens

 Texas Water Utility Journal; August 2014 edition; Pages 20-22 Article title:

Record High Temperatures May Activate Hidden Microbes in Your Water Distribution System–   What’s hiding in your distribution system

Web sites: www.ronperrin.com   http://www.watertankinspection.com

See our ROV Water Tank Inspection Post and Video Here: www.thetankdiver.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ronperrinwatertech

I have posted multiple articles on linked in:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/ron-perrin-40609522

Ron Perrin Television Interview:

POSTED 10:35 PM, MAY 8, 2017, BY CHRIS HAYES,

UPDATED AT 03:24PM, MAY 8, 2017

http://fox2now.com/2017/05/08/town-with-brown-water-has-no-record-of-cleaning-its-water-tower/

Since 2011 I have served on the Educational Advisory Board for The Ocean Corporation commercial diver and ROV educational program.

And last, if you are tasked with inspecting a water storage tank and are not allowed or do not have funds for an inspection contractor click here to see our post on HOW TO INSPECT YOUR OWN WATER STORAGE TANK:

Do Your Own Potable Water Tank Inspection Page

For more information on municipal water tank inspections see:

www.watertankinspection.com

Contact info:

Office Phone: 817-377-4899 Toll free 1-888-481-1768

E-mail: tankinspections@aol.com

 

 

 

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: What’s in Your Water?

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: What’s in Your Water?  is a documentary where microbiologists and tank inspection professionals discuss the importance of having potable water storage tanks inspected and cleaned regularly. Currently the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has no regulations that require potable water storage tanks to be cleaned. We are hoping to raise awareness of this issue in order to change that.

We have been working on this project for over two years and it it time to raise some cash to finish it up.  I hope you will be a part of this, please click here and find out how you can help!  https://igg.me/at/whatsinyourwater/x/11623864

We offer potable water tank inspections and cleaning.

Potable Water Diver

Potable Water Diver

Since 1997 Ron Perrin Water Technologies has served the water utility industry providing state-of-the-art inspections with remote underwater cameras.  Our inspection reports are the best in the industry, covering all state requirements for water tank and tower inspection and meeting all AWWA guidelines.  Our inspections cover over 30 inspection points.  Digital photography documents the condition of your tank, and our narrated underwater video lets you see first-hand what the inside roof walls and floor areas of the tank look like.

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For those experiencing an EPA total coliform violation, our underwater inspections are a perfect place to start assessing your problem. Should accumulated sediment be found in the tank, our potable water dive crew can offer a cleaning solution that may be the only step needed to satisfy the Revised Total Coliform Rule requirement to take action.  Accumulated tank sediment can be a safe habitat for bacteria, protozoa, viruses and other contaminants.  Removing the sediment is often the only step required to comply with the Revised Total Coliform Rule**, in fact, our customers tell us time after time that their chlorine costs were significantly reduced after the tank was cleaned.

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Diving in potable water is an art.  Unlike offshore divers, potable water divers must be able to enter the water system without disrupting sediment on the floor of the tanks.  Our divers are sealed in a dry suit so no part of their body touches the water.  They are then washed down with a 200ppm chlorine solution to meet AWWA and state standards.  The diver is then free to go into the confined space inside the water storage tanks. Underwater, the diver can do a more detailed inspection, or clean the loose sediment from the floor of the tank.

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We are here to help you get it done!  We offer the most choices for your inspection needs:

*Remote underwater camera (drop camera)

*ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle (specially designed and only used in potable water)

*Diver inspection – For the most detail

*Basic state requirements covered with, or without, photos to meet budget needs

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We have served over 500 water utilities since 1997.  Our customers include municipalities, prisons, universities and military bases.  They all have one thing in common – they wanted comprehensive documentation about the status of their water tank, with no water loss and no disruption in service.

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For more information about in-service tank inspections and cleaning, please see our primary web site at: www.ronperrin.com .

Or call 888-481-1768 for a free no obligation quote.

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**On February 13, 2013, EPA published in the Federal Register the revisions to the 1989 TCR.  EPA anticipates greater public   health protection under the Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) requirements.  The RTCR:

  • Requires public water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems; and
  • Establishes criteria for systems to qualify for and stay on reduced monitoring, which could reduce water system burden and provide incentives for better system operation.
  • Click here for more information about the RTCR.